Auschwitz 'In Memoriam'

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Auschwitz 'In Memoriam'

Postby astro3 » 1 decade 1 month ago (Tue Jun 19, 2007 8:01 am)

Auschwitz In Memoriam

Violently incompatible stories swirl about the little town of Oswiecim/Auschwitz, as if two quite different places had somehow managed to co-exist there, sixty years ago. These stories cannot all be true. The United Nations has requested that Holocaust Memorial Day be commemorated on January 27th - the day the Auschwitz camp was ‘liberated’ in 1945. Let us make a website to honour this day, i.e. one which will hold a memory of the Auschwitz camp. It could somewhat resemble major ‘Holocaust Memorial Day’ sites (eg, http://www.hmd.org.uk/about/), but its focus would be on the titanic struggle between Lies and the Truth.

To counteract the Greatest Lie Ever Told, I suggest focusing on concrete details of how the wartime labour-camp functioned. For example, an aesthetically elegant swimming-pool clearly exists, and was built by the inmates. Unable to deny this, the authorities have erected a sign saying, ‘Fire brigade reservoir built in the form of a swimming pool.’ This absurd notice is also given in Hebrew - but even that won’t make it true.

Let us hope for the publication in English of a proper book about what the camp was like. Was there really an in-camp court and jail functioning (opposite the gynaecological facility)? Can we hear more about the marriages conducted at Auschwitz, the pregnancies there, the 3,000 live births recorded at the maternity hospital, and how did the child care day-centre work? There might be a problem with finding a publisher …

1. Jacque Pressac’s magnum opus Auschwitz (1988), choc-a-block with plans and diagrams, somehow omitted mention of the swimming-pool in the camp [1]. Built by the inmates, it had a diving board and 'starters' blocks for races. Inmates would sunbathe beside it on Saturday and Sunday afternoons, while watching the water-polo matches [2].

2. Still today, we can view the paintings from its art class. [3] These may be somewhat melancholic (after all, two-and-a-half million tons of bombs were being dropped onto central Europe by the US/UK, targeting the cities) yet no means do they express despair.

3. The camp library had some forty-five thousand volumes for inmates to choose from, plus a range of periodicals.

4. Inmates were paid for their labour and services while interned at Auschwitz concentration camp [Berg, 2006], and special money was printed for their use.[4] Through extra work inmates could obtain such coupons, redeemable for cake or ice cream in the Camp Cantina.

5. There were six camp orchestras [5] at Auschwitz/Birkenau alone, one of which contained no less than 100-120 musicians. The Jerusalem Post recorded one inmate’s memory, of singing in its choir the Beethoven’s 9th Chorale [6]. In 1943, Daniel K (now a professor) was only 10 years old, and as such he participated in the children’s choir ‘I … remember my first engagement with culture, with history, and with music – in the camp.’

6. Also theatrical performances, including a children’s opera, were held at the centre. A camp theatre, where a rather saucy review was held on Saturdays [7]. Today a convent of Carmelite nuns dwells there. The last pictures taken inside showed pianos and costumes and a stage where the inmates used to put on productions.

7. Birkenau at Auschwitz had its own soccer field, with weekly games between the SS staff and camp inmates, and a central sauna. There was also fencing class. The football field was adjacent to the site of alleged human gassing (i.e. the morgue, according to the design plans) so its hard to see how this fiendish process could have been carried on in secret, as normally alleged.

8. At the weekly camp cinema, mainly cultural and non-political films were shown.

9. Legal advice was available to the inmates, in relation to any non-natural deaths. The SS-men were not allowed to hit prisoners – and commander Hoess had a standing order that any inmate could approach him personally to register a complaint.

10. Some 4,800 sick prisoners were under medical care [8]. There was an inmates dental unit. The surgical block was very modern for the time (Elie Wiesel was operated on there, as described in his Night essay) and expert surgeons from the famous Berlin "Charité" surgical clinic were dispatched to deal with difficult cases. The cook-houses provided "dietetic cooking" for some of the sick, with "special soups and even a special bread." [9]

11. Visitors were free to come and go at the Auschwitz camps, eg visits of the wives of the inmates took place.

12. In the summer of 1943 the camp brothel was established just inside the main gate, on Himmler’s orders, to reward privileged prisoners, with medical checkups before each visit. [10].

13. Women’s sections of the camps had female guards.

14. Letters to and from the outside world were collected twice weekly. A postcard sent from Auschwitz [11] dated 18 February, 1942 by Johann Klausa expresses the hope that his family is in good health and hopes they will write to him - he was eventually released from the camp, on 27 November, 1943. Considering that Klausa arrived in the camp on 25 June 1940, he sounds quite cheerful.

15. The Education Centre: In March 1944 Daniel K. became severely ill with diphtheria and was transferred to the camp’s hospital barracks.
One of the youth leaders of our group … asked to establish an education centre for children. He was given permission, and in a short time the education centre became a spiritual and social centre for the family camp. It was the soul of the camp. There were discussions of various ideologies – Zionism, Socialism, Czech nationalism, .. There was a conductor named Imré .. who organised the children’s choir. Rehearsals were held in a huge washroom barracks where the acoustics were good …[12]


16. Microwave delousing As part of the struggle against typhus, the cyanide-gas delousing method (using Zyklon-B) was partially replaced by micro-wave delousing process in May, 1943. State-of-the-art technology was thus taking place at Auschwitz, developed by the Siemens company, described by Germar Rudolf as ‘the world’s first technological predecessor to the microwave ovens in common use today.’[13] Birkenau was the largest labour complex in the Reich and therefore received this special treatment. Owing to Allied bombing its implementation was delayed and it did not become operational until the summer of 1944. It turned out to be highly effective, rendering clothing sterile and vermin-free in minutes.


I consulted the author Carlo Mattogno [14] on the above list of items and he replied (16.6.07) ‘I have verified the affirmations on the basis of documents.’ That gives me confidence in posting this! But, do please write if you believe any of the statements above are incorrect. Any more details, or other sources supporting these points, will be gratefully appreciated.

The Monowitz labour camp at Auschwitz was concerned with synthetic rubber production, and the degree to which this functioned effectively would indicate the level of camp morale. Birkenau was more an internment camp for gypsies, women and children, the chronically ill and those incapable of labour, also a transit camp [15].



References
1. David Irving’s 1991 edition of The Leuchter Report first published an image of this pool.
2. http://www.heretical.com/miscella/swimpool.html
3. Auschwitz art: http://judicial-inc.biz/Auschwitz.htm
4. http://www.codoh.com/gcgv/gcgvcole.html
5. http://judicial-inc.biz/Auschwitz.htm http://www.cympm.com/orkest.html
6. Georges Theil, Heresy, In twenty-first Century France 2006 p.54.
7. 25 Jan 1995, Jerusalem Post Domestic Edn., The Rudolf Report 2003, p.49.
8. Data from the Auschwitz trial at Frankfurt, read out at the trial of General Remer on 22 October 1992 by his lawyer Hajo Hermann: The Rudolf Report, p.360.
9. Mark Klein, De l'Université aux camps de concentration: Télmorgnages 1947, p.26, quoted by Robert Faurisson, ref.2.
10. http://downwithjugears.blogspot.com/200 ... hwitz.html
11. http://www.ety.com/HRP/pol/auschwitzauction.htm
12. Ref. 6
13. The Rudolf Report p.73.
14.author of, Auschwitz – end of a Legend, a Critique of Pressac, 1994
15.W. Staeglich, Auschwitz – a Judge Looks at the Evidence IHR 1986



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Postby _Mads_ » 1 decade 1 month ago (Tue Jun 19, 2007 1:37 pm)

This is a very good little list of things you can bring forward when discussing Auschwitz, thank you.

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Postby astro3 » 1 decade 3 weeks ago (Tue Jul 24, 2007 3:23 pm)

Eyewitness Testimony
The following testimony appeared on the David Irving website, discussed see the CODOH thread, http://forum.codoh.com/viewtopic.php?t=4409. It is by Bernhard B. of Queensland, Australia, who was born in the town of Konigshutte a few kilometres from Oswiecim/Auschwitz in March 1945, just after his mother's experience here alluded to. His mother, who is not Jewish, spent a few days in the Auschwitz camp in December 1944. In 1977 he went to visit her in New South Wales, Australia, and: ' With her memory still clear and sharp, I did my best at documenting her wartime stories.'

I asked her if there was anything she saw which might suggest millions of people had died there in Gas Chambers. At this, she says something incomprehensible in Russian or Ukrainian and spits on the floor, her facial expression now serious, she looks me in the eye and says:

"Look, I was there, 25 of us were there, women talk. In our group there was a Doctor, there was a Chemist, the Nuns were Teachers, I was a Teacher and let me tell you if there had been anything suspicious there we would have known. If there had been millions killed the entire communities around this region would have known and would have talked about it to us. Remember rumours were everywhere, there was no TV and by then no Newspaper where ever we went locals would ask us about the where the Russians were or if the fighting was coming closer"
"The fact is none of us saw anything, heard anything or even suspected anything unusual about Auschwitz. The suggestion that the tired but extremely well mannered OLD gentlemen of the SS who treated us so decently, murdered millions of people in Gas Chambers is an outrageous, monstrous lie."

And that, so help me, was what she said ten years ago to me.

Uh-huh.

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Postby astro3 » 1 decade 3 weeks ago (Tue Jul 24, 2007 4:59 pm)

David Cole's Query
Concerning point (7) above, the following comment by David Cole is of interest. It was posted up onto the CODOH site in 1995, www.codoh.com/gcgv/gc46-origi.html*:
The area between Kremas 2 and 3, where thousands of people were marched daily to their deaths, was left completely unfenced. Doesn't the Auschwitz State Museum claim that the inmates would often "riot" as they were being marched toward Kremas 2 and 3?

Kremas 2 and 3 [were] not hidden in any way from the view of the inmates… Why then were Kremas 2 and 3 put in plain sight of all sectors of the Birkenau camp, with no camouflage of any kind?


* The previous year, this highly perceptive and discerning young Jew was, alas, silenced by a Jewish Mafia death-threat.

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Postby Hannover » 1 decade 3 weeks ago (Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:24 pm)

Auschwitz swimming pool
Image
Image
Image

Another swimming pool (in background) at the Mauthausen camp, undoubtedly a 'fire brigade reservoir'.
Image

Auschwitz orchestras
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Auschwitz clinic for Jews
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Children at the 'liberation' of Auschwitz, January 1945
(all children and elderly were supposedly gassed)
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Auschwitz theater
Auschwww1.jpg
Auschwww1.jpg (18.54 KiB) Viewed 19708 times

Auschw2.jpg
Auschw2.jpg (11.17 KiB) Viewed 19708 times


Auschwitz brothel
Auscheewew3.jpg
Auscheewew3.jpg (7.41 KiB) Viewed 19708 times


Auschwitz marriages
Auschw8.jpg


Auschwitz inmate money
Auschw4.jpg
Auschw4.jpg (2.22 KiB) Viewed 19708 times

Auschw16.jpg
Auschw16.jpg (6.29 KiB) Viewed 19708 times


postcards from Auschwitz at time of alleged 'gassings'
etrdfsxz.jpg
etrdfsxz.jpg (13.56 KiB) Viewed 19708 times

see:
Postcard from Auschwitz / prisoner later released 11/43
viewtopic.php?t=346
ausasdachw6.jpg

postcard_back.jpg


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If it can't happen as alleged, then it didn't.

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Postby Harald » 1 decade 3 weeks ago (Wed Jul 25, 2007 2:41 pm)

I think the swimming pool is a bad example. It might have been intended for SS members only.

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Postby Hannover » 1 decade 3 weeks ago (Wed Jul 25, 2007 4:22 pm)

Harald wrote:I think the swimming pool is a bad example. It might have been intended for SS members only.

It seems a Mr. Marc Klein confirms inmate use of the pool. He mentions it at least two times in his recollections of the camp; De l'Université aux camps de concentration: Télmorgnages strasbourgeois, Paris, les Belles-lettres, 1947; and Observations et réflexions sur les camps de concentration nazis.
more:
www.heretical.com/miscella/swimpool.html

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Postby Hektor » 1 decade 2 weeks ago (Mon Jul 30, 2007 9:52 am)

Harald wrote:I think the swimming pool is a bad example. It might have been intended for SS members only.
But why is there direct access from the inmate barracks? Then there is the Marc Klein mentioned by Hannover:
http://www.1faulhaber.de/osiris.sb/mcausche.html
In fact it seems his page has been removed - find it here

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Postby astro3 » 1 decade 3 days ago (Wed Aug 15, 2007 6:33 am)

Law in the Labour-Camps of Auschwitz

Mr Carlo Mattogno (author: http://vho.org/dl/ENG/aoai.pdf ) has a forthcoming book that will touch on labour conditions at Auschwitz. I asked him about how well its inmates were treated, in relation to the industrial production at the 'Monowitz' plant. He replied:
There are several documents which prove that the SS policy towards inmates was the preservation of their labour capacity; the SS couldn't maltreat inmates and whoever infringed this rule would be punished. The SS also instituted productivity recompenses for Jewish inmates.

He added, 'All the camp rules prevented from maltreating inmates. For ex. the “Verpflichtung” (engagement) that the SS guards were obliged to subscribe imposed:
I know that the Führer only can decide on life and death of a state enemy. I cannot damage physically or bring to death a state opponent (inmates). Any killing of an inmate in a KL requires the written authorization of the Reichsführer-SS. (Mir ist bekannt, daß nur der Führer allein über Leben und Tod eines Staatsfeindes entscheidet. Ich darf keinen Staatsgegner (Häftling) körperlich schädigen oder zu Tode bringen. Jede Tötung eines Häftlings in einem Konzentrationslager bedarf der persönlichen Genehmigung des Reichsführers-SS.)


Thanks to Mr Mattogno for permission to quote.

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Postby astro3 » 9 years 3 months ago (Sun May 18, 2008 4:18 am)

THE SWIMMING POOL
Image
First-hand testimony seems only available from the Frenchman Marc Klein.
Mention of the pool first appears in 1985 at the Zundel trial in Toronto.

Marc Klein
‘The working hours were modified on Sundays and holidays, when most of the kommandos were at leisure. Roll call was at around noon; evenings were devoted to rest and to a choice of cultural and sporting activities. Football, basketball, and water-polo matches (in an open-air pool built within the perimeter by detainees) attracted crowds of onlookers. It should be noted that only the very fit and well-fed, exempt from the harsh jobs, could indulge in these games which drew the liveliest applause from the masses of other detainees.’ - Marc Klein, professor at the Strasbourg medicine faculty, 'Auschwitz I Stammlager' published in 1947 ( http://www.heretical.com/miscella/swimpool.html ) He had first submitted this recollection "to the reading and scrutiny of Robert Weil, professor of science at Sarreguemines lycée," who had been interned in the same camps.

Ditlieb Felderer
A (Swedish) witness Ditlieb Felderer testified: ‘Slides depicted the two starting blocks, the mount for the springboard and the showers. Piper told Felderer that the pool had been used to rehabilitate inmate patients and as recreation … Some literature of Holocaust survivors referred to this swimming pool and how it was used for water polo. ( http://www.ihr.org/books/kulaszka/13felderer.html )

Fredrick toben
‘Inmates from Auschwitz and surrounding camps enjoyed swimming and sunbathing beside the pool on Saturday and Sunday afternoons. Although not as popular as sports like soccer, some competition was organized where inmates from different countries of origin, and different camps, raced in individual and relay events.’
Faurisson quotes these words in his article, and told me that this quote from ‘Fredrick Töben’ was ‘inspired by Klein’s own words’

Did Six Million Really Die? Report of the Evidence:
‘The swimming pool at Auschwitz I was located inside the electrified fence and measured 25 metres long, 6 metres wide, and 3 metres deep. Slides depicted the two starting blocks, the mount for the springboard and the showers. Piper told Felderer that the pool had been used to rehabilitate inmate patients and as recreation. There was never any denial by the Auschwitz Museum administration that the pool was there during the war and aerial photographs taken by the Allies confirmed its existence. Felderer requested Auschwitz officials to provide him with the blueprints of the pool but without success. Some literature of Holocaust survivors referred to this swimming pool and how it was used for water polo. One such survivor who had written about the pool was a person named Kreuz. Inmates were sometimes also allowed to swim in the nearby Sola River. Felderer obtained this information from interviews with Jehovah's Witnesses who had been interned in the camp and from "survivor" accounts.’
- It seems to me that there should be a bit more of an account by Felderer somewhere, in this case.

For the (absurd) claim that this pool was merely a water reservoir for use by firemen, see Laurence Rees Auschwitz, a New History 2005.

Klein: De l'Université aux camps de concentration: Télmorgnages strasbourgeois, Paris, les Belles lettres, 1947, p. 453.

Klein: Observations et réflexions sur les camps de concentration Nazis (booklet of 32 pages printed in Caen, 1948, p. 10; its text is a reproduction of the author's article published in Etudes germaniques, n° 3, 1948, pp. 244-275.

R. Esrail, registration no. 173295, « Une piscine à Auschwitz », in Après Auschwitz (Bulletin de l'Amicale des déportés d'Auschwitz), n° 264/octobre 1997, p. 10).

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Postby astro3 » 9 years 2 months ago (Wed Jun 04, 2008 12:06 pm)

GROWING RUBBER AT MONOWITZ

‘The hoeing detachment from Birkenau was a merry bunch. They sang their Polish folk-songs while working and the gypsies danced to the melodies. In the beginning I was quite upset and worried about the undernourished appearance of some of the inmates. Then I learned that they had arrived in rather poor physical shape and it took some extra time before they had padded themselves with some extra poundage.’

The Auschwitz Lie by Thies Christophersen provoked uproar when it was published in 1973, becoming an under-the-counter bestseller. It contrasted the scientific work at Monowitz for rubber-production with the bigger but rather seedy transit-camp of Birkenau - lying East and West of the village of Oswiecim. ‘I have stated the truth, so help me God,’ his essay concluded – not many people did that.

The camp when he walked into it in January 1944 ‘consisted of barracks that were ugly but massively built.’ He was surprised to see so many inmates walking around unguarded. The camp ‘was under guard only at night.’ A horse-drawn carriage was available to drive round the ‘extensive lands that were under cultivation.’ Mr Christopherson stayed at Raisko, 3 km from the main camp, where ‘the botany buildings with their hot houses, and the laboratories for our research work were located.’ A few hundred Jewish and Polish women mainly did this plant research: ‘I had the impression that the inmates performed their research tasks gladly and with enthusiasm.’

The Kaiser Wilhelm Institut had a branch there, which T.C. joined. Having an agricultural training, he had been sent to a college which grew India rubber plants. Synthetic ‘buna’ rubber is made from carbon, lime and sulphur, plus natural India rubber to give cohesion. They obtained this from ‘Kok Sagis,’ a close relative of the dandelion plant, which had they found white latex in its roots, containing this India rubber. Fields of it were grown, at Auschwitz, and tyres were made from it, vital for Germany’s war-effort.

The roots of plants were examined as to their India-rubber content and reproduced through seedlings. ‘Sabotage could easily have been committed but we never learned of even a single instance. It must be mentioned however that the inmates did not trust each other. There was that ancient feeling of hate between Jews and Poles. Compared to this hate, so-called National Socialist hatred of the Jews was quite harmless.’

There were some fine-looking ladies: ‘Surprising to me was the elegance of the inmates’ wearing apparel. Their outer garments did, of course, consist of uniforms, but all other apparel, including shoes, was of the finest quality, nor was there any lack in beauty care, and make-up was all part of the female dress. Every Saturday our women were sent to the main camp for an exchange of laundry and they brought back alluring bits of booty…’ In May his wife came to visit him: ‘we were able to have our relatives visit us at any time.’ She saw the work on the india-rubber fields.

The camp at Birkenau was very different: ‘This camp I did not like. It was overcrowded and the people there did not make a good impression on me. Everything looked neglected and grubby. T.C. had been commissioned to pick 100 workers to tend the Kok-Sagis plants: ‘the fact was, however, that in Auschwitz there were more people than there were jobs.’

Discipline:
On one occasion I saw an SS guard kick a woman. I confronted him about this. He claimed that the woman had called him a Nazi pig, but the fact was that he had first insulted her. I reported this case and the SS-guard was sent to “Strafbataillon” in Danzig. From this day on, my favour with the inmates rose significantly, especially with those in Detachment 11. They often came to me with requests or complaints and I did whatever I could for them, because to me they were not enemies. Often, I did favours for them that were against regulations. Their greatest joy was for me to take them for a walk down to the river Sula, where on those hot summer days of 1944 I allowed them to go bathing.


Entertainment:
Once a week a film was shown. Camp supervisors and inmates jointly saw, amongst others, ‘Muenchhausen’ and the ‘golden city.’ Church services were held in community halls. I attended several myself and found them to be quite solemn, especially those of the Russian orthodox community, to which our Russian civil workers also belonged. A theatre group had been organised by the inmates and one evening they invited us to a performance of ‘Faust.’ Professional actors could not have put on a better show.


A camp odour?
During all the time I was in Auschwitz I never in the least observed anything that even indicated mass killings in gas chambers. Also the story of a smell of burned flesh that allegedly hovered over the camp at times was an infamous lie. In the vicinity of the main camp there was a smithy where horses’ hooves were shod. The burning of the horses’ hooves when fitting them with shoes naturally caused an unpleasant smell.


‘There were no secrets at Auschwitz. A commission of the Red Cross visited in September 1944, being mainly concerned to inspect Birkenau. ‘We also had a great many inspections at Raisko, but her people who came were largely interested in plant cultivation.’ He learnt to construct a harvesting machine, also to operate radio sets. ‘the inmates also found material there with which they could build small radios…I myself learned to build radios at Auschwitz. My teachers were the inmates and they supplied me with everything I needed for a small receiving set.’

He was present when ‘About every two weeks the SS officers met for a casino night. On these occasions, department leaders spoke about their particular field of work. I heard any interesting lectures there and I do not recall anything that might have been offensive.’ He found ‘not plausible’ the notion of experiments conducted on living human beings, about which he heard after the war.

Concerning the famous big chimney of Auschwitz:
After the war I saw a TV film about Auschwitz that showed a building with huge smokestacks. I am very sorry, but when I left the camp at Auschwitz in December 1944, I did not see this building. I cannot imagine that these smoke stacks were built in the cold winter of 1944/45, but I suspect that these structures were erected after the war.’


An Endnote by Attorney Manfred Roeder stated: ‘I know enough eyewitnesses now who were in Auschwitz after the war who confirm all of the observations made by Mr Christophersen … but these witnesses fear reprisals by the Poles and certain Jewish organisations.’

For his later reflections on the book, after being jailed for a year for it: http://vho.org/GB/Journals/JHR/6/1/Chri ... 7-121.html
Last edited by astro3 on Thu Jun 05, 2008 3:55 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby jemand » 9 years 2 months ago (Thu Jun 05, 2008 12:24 am)

Hektor wrote:
Harald wrote:I think the swimming pool is a bad example. It might have been intended for SS members only.
But why is there direct access from the inmate barracks? Then there is the Marc Klein mentioned by Hannover:
http://www.1faulhaber.de/osiris.sb/mcausche.html
In fact it seems his page has been removed - find it here

Neither of the two links works anymore, but this one does:

http://web.archive.org/web/200308290509 ... usche.html

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Postby astro3 » 9 years 2 months ago (Sat Jun 07, 2008 9:49 am)

The Raisko Labs: Two different accounts

Mark Klein, Professor of medicine at the University of Strasbourg recalled in 1948 his time at Raisko (in the link given above). His account of Auschwitz t has SS-guards as horrible, Orc-like figures of menace (to use the Tolkein mythology). Like Christophersen he stayed at the laboratories of Raisko. But, he recalls spending his time looking at human tissue down a microscope (??). In the general nightmare atmosphere we never get what the point of this was for. No industrial synthetic rubber production takes place on his account, no selection of plant roots for India rubber content – however, it might be briefly acknowledged in the far distance:
The smoking chimneys of the buna factories visible in a distance of some kilometers reminded us to the - compared with ours - much harder jobs being a heavy burden to the thousands of comrades at the neighbor camp Monowitz.
It is hard to reconcile these two different accounts.

Klein does however recall:
On Sundays and holidays …. the great majority did not have to work. … In the afternoon, there were soccer-, basketball- and water-polo-tournaments under the vivid acclamation of the spectators… At a cinema, news movies of the Nazis were presented as well as sentimental movies. There was a rather popular cabaret doing frequent presentations, which were often even visited by SS-staff. Finally, there was a remarkable orchestra, which was manned with Polish musicians during the first time, which later were replaced by a group of first class musicians of all nationalities, the majority of them being Jewish.

Further details of the synthetic rubber production may be found in :
• overall matter of the SS industries in the book of Joseph Billig Les camps de concentration dans l'économie du Reich hitlérien. Presses Universitaires de France, Paris
• Bernd C. Wagner, IG Auschwitz. Zwangsarbeit und Vernichtung von Häftlingen des Lagers Monowitz 1941-1945. Saur Verlag, München 2000,
• Franciszek Piper, Arbeitseinsatz der Häftlinge aus dem KL Auschwitz.Verlag Staatliches Museum in Oswiecim, 1995
It would be good to have a bit more detail about this.

Carlo Mattogno gave these refs, and added: ‘the highest force of the Monowitz camp was about 25,500 inmates in 1944.’

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Postby astro3 » 9 years 1 month ago (Mon Jul 07, 2008 2:25 pm)

Primo Levi and Buna Rubber production

Has anyone read Primo Levi's work, Se questo è un uomo? Faurisson writes,
The first part of the book is the longest and the most important ... edited in 1947; the author says, starting on page 19, that it was after the war he learned about the gassing of the Jews at Birkenau; he himself was working at Buna-Monowitz and had never set foot in Birkenau.
Well how interesting that this famous industrial chemist, author of the classic The Periodic Table , worked in the synthetic rubber production labs at Auschwitz - and like Christoffersen never got to hear of any human gassings.

I wonder ifhis book gives any details, that might corroborate Christoffersen's memories, about the industrial ruber production? Everyone knows of Primo Levi and some details of his lab work at A. would be of great interest.
(Faurisson, Dissecting the Holocaust, http://www.vho.org/GB/Books/dth/fndwitness.html)

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Postby Laurentz Dahl » 9 years 1 month ago (Tue Jul 08, 2008 10:20 am)

I believe Rajsko was located some kilometers south from Auschwitz I, II and III, but I may be wrong. I will try to find a map of the area.

Edit: here is one:

http://vho.org/GB/Books/trr/AMap.gif


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