Basketball star Ray Allen praised for Auschwitz visit and essay

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Basketball star Ray Allen praised for Auschwitz visit and essay

Postby Sannhet » 2 months 1 week ago (Wed Aug 09, 2017 10:16 am)

Ray Allen (b. 1975), a Black American basketball (NBA) player, relatively famous in the basketball world, (described as "one of the most accurate three-point and free throw shooters in NBA history"), is in the news some three years after retiring from the NBA. He has been praised for a visit to Auschwitz and for then publishing an essay on the Holocaust (in The Players' Tribune, apparently a news outlet with original content published by professional athletes).

I post below the transcript of the interview with Allen on NPR (U.S. quasi-government radio). Though Allen seems to be a typical "Holocaust drone," there are lot of good nuggets of information here, as well; like his account of his personal conversion to Holocaustism after watching Schindler's List at about age 18 (1993). The most interesting area of the interview may be towards the end, which touches on 'Holocaust Politics' in that some Black activists in the U.S. have criticized Allen for the essay. They allege his Holocaust promotion efforts put Jewish interests above Black interests...

Former NBA Star Ray Allen Visits Holocaust History In Auschwitz
August 5, 2017 / [Link]

[...] Ray has always been fascinated by the Holocaust. In fact, whenever his team would visit Washington, D.C., to play the Wizards, Ray would make a visit to the National Holocaust Museum.

Recently, Ray Allen decided to see the history in person. He visited the Auschwitz concentration camp in Poland, and he wrote about the experience this week in The Players' Tribune. We called him at his home in Connecticut to hear more about his trip and some of the unexpected reactions he's gotten.

[Interviewer speaking to Ray Allen] So you write in your essay that you have been fascinated by World War II and the Holocaust since you were a teenager. Why is that?

RAY ALLEN: Well, first, I grew up as a Air Force brat. My dad was a metals technician in the Air Force. And so I lived and grew up in Germany. I grew up in England. So I had opportunity to see things differently. So I've always had this curiosity about the world. And, you know, I had this ability to kind of think outside my own self and put myself in those people's shoes. And, you know, so as I became of college age, I watched "Schindler's List." It was 1993. And it really, like, unearthed a lot in me. And it made me realize that, you know, how much good one person can do and vice versa, how much bad one person can do.

SMITH: And what made you want to visit Auschwitz specifically?

ALLEN: There's so many different stories that have come out of the Holocaust, so many different movies that I've watched that really show the human condition, people's will to survive. And, you know, I always ask myself, if I was in those situations, what would I do? Would I be brave? It's easy for me to say I'm brave now, you know. I'm tall. I'm, you know, strong. I've played in the NBA for many years.

You know, I come from a good family. You know, it's easy to talk about being brave Now in the position I'm in, but would I be brave if I was under those circumstances where, you know, I had to fight for my survival, having not eaten in days, weeks or months? Like, how tough would I have been then? How strong would I have been?

SMITH: Right. I mean, in your essay, you talk about people who hid Jewish families in their basements, risking their own lives to do that. And you ask yourself if you would have done the same. Would you have done the same?

ALLEN: The easy answer is yes. It's easy to say, yeah, I'm going to fight for, you know, someone who can't fight themselves. But, you know, I have five children. And would I put my 5-year-old in harm's way? Like, it's easy for me to say I want to help other people, but in helping other people, would I be killing my own family? Now, a lot of people made that choice. And a lot of people saved a lot of lives.

And I would like to think that I was - I would be that courageous. There's obviously no way to be able to tell, but that is, I think, the ultimate question that we live with every day because there's things that happen every single day now today. And it doesn't result in maybe us losing our lives or family member losing their lives, but are we willing to fight for the next person when it doesn't benefit us?

SMITH: In the piece, titled "Why I Went To Auschwitz," Ray Allen writes about the overwhelming feelings he had as he stood in front of what he called the horror of the history.

ALLEN: (Reading) We walked through the barracks and gas chambers. And what I remember most is what I heard - nothing. I've never experienced silence like that.

SMITH: This is an excerpt where he describes visiting the gas chambers for the first time.

ALLEN: (Reading) Apart from footsteps, the complete lack of sound was almost jarring. It's eerie and sobering. You're standing in these rooms where so much death has taken place, and your mind is trying to come to terms with all that's happened in this space. I stood outside for a while by myself, thinking about everything I experienced. Why do we learn about the Holocaust? Is it just so we can make sure nothing like this ever happens again? Is it because 6 million people died? Yes, but there's a bigger reason I think. The Holocaust was about how human beings, real normal people like you and me, treat each other.

SMITH: Many questions, many reflections, many unexpected emotions - that's what Ray Allen says this journey drummed up in him. The one thing he did not expect? Criticism. When Ray returned home and posted about his trip on social media, some people blasted back. They didn't like the fact that he seemed to be raising awareness for what had happened in Poland to Jews and not using that time or energy to support people in the black community. You got quite a few really strong reactions to your visit to Auschwitz. Not all of them were positive. Why do you think there was that response?

ALLEN: Because, again, the way, you know, we get thrust into these situations in the first place is because people can't see past their own color, past their own hate. And the reason that I brought that up was because people are looking at this as a color issue. You know, you want to talk about this issue and say, well, why are we still talking about this? And why is, you know, why are you supporting Jewish people? And my response has been consistent every time is that this is not about Jewish people. This is about people. You know, just because that's their religion, look at what was done to them. You know, this is a lesson for us in all walks of life.

And there's so many different atrocities that have taken place. This is just the atrocity that we are speaking about right now. We can talk about the genocide all over the world, you know, that's taking place in so many different countries, but we just happen to be talking about the Holocaust. I've studied slavery just the same. And this is slavery just the same. I'm speaking on behalf of people, people who can't speak for themselves, you know, atrocities. You know, teaching kids now - we got kids in school now that don't know what the Holocaust is, you know, but yet, they'll know - they know what a bully is. Bullies turn into dictators. Dictators end up bullying. You know, we can't have that in this world that we live in. We know too much.

SMITH: That was Ray Allen. He played in the NBA for 18 years. His piece on his journey to Auschwitz ran this week in The Players' Tribune.



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Re: Basketball star Ray Allen praised for Auschwitz visit and essay

Postby Hektor » 2 months 1 week ago (Wed Aug 09, 2017 12:37 pm)

Does this Basketball star have a social media presence?

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Re: Basketball star Ray Allen praised for Auschwitz visit and essay

Postby Hannover » 2 months 1 week ago (Wed Aug 09, 2017 7:41 pm)

Ray Allen must think that Disneyland is proof that Mickey Mouse is real.
There is nothing other than falsely labelled props at Auschwitz to support the phony and scientifically impossible 'gas chambers' claims.
Recall the Potemkin Villages.

The power of stagecraft.

And of course Ray Allen, at the end of his career, could be sucking up for a lucrative TV sports gig.

- Hannover

From an earlier post.
Study: It's Easy to Plant False Memories

The Associated Press, Sun 16 Feb 2003
http://www.cnn.com/2003/HEALTH/02/16/fa ... index.html

DENVER (AP) — Remember that wonderful day when Bugs Bunny hugged you at Disneyland? A study presented Sunday shows just how easy it can be to induce false memories in the minds of some people.

More than a third of subjects in the study recalled that theme-park moment — impossible because Bugs is not a Disney character — after a researcher planted the false memory.

Other research, of people who believed they were abducted by space aliens, shows that even false memories can be as intensely felt as those of real-life victims of war and other violence.

The research demonstrates that police interrogators and people investigating sexual-abuse allegations must be careful not to plant suggestions into their subjects, said University of California-Irvine psychologist Elizabeth Loftus. She presented preliminary results of recent false memory experiments Sunday at the national meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Loftus said some people may be so suggestible that they could be convinced they were responsible for crimes they didn't commit. In interviews, ``much of what goes on — unwittingly — is contamination,'' she said.

The news media's power of suggestion also can leave a false impression, Loftus said.

``During the Washington sniper attacks, everyone reported seeing a white van,'' she said. ``Where did it come from? The whole country was seeing white vans.''

A key, researchers said, is to add elements of touch, taste, sound and smell to the story.

In the Bugs Bunny study, Loftus talked with subjects about their childhoods and asked not only whether they saw someone dressed up as the character, but also whether they hugged his furry body and stroked his velvety ears. In subsequent interviews, 36 percent of the subjects recalled the cartoon rabbit.

In another study, Loftus suggested frog-kissing incidents that 15 percent of the group later recalled.

``It is sensory details that people use to distinguish their memories,'' said Loftus, who has conducted false memories experiments on 20,000 subjects over 25 years. ``If you imbue the story with them, you'll disrupt this memory process. It's almost a recipe to get people to remember things that aren't true.''

In other research presented Sunday, Harvard University psychologist Richard McNally tested 10 people who said they had been abducted, physically examined and sexually molested by space aliens.

Researchers tape-recorded the subjects talking about their memories. When the recordings were played back later, the purported abductees perspired and their heart rates jumped.

McNally said three of the 10 subjects showed physical reactions ``at least as great'' as people suffering post traumatic stress disorder from war, crime, rape and other violent incidents.

``This underscores the power of emotional belief,'' McNally said.
also see:
For more on easily manufactured 'memories' and fantasies:

'Key to False Memories Uncovered'
viewtopic.php?t=4629

'False memories as 'facts' / some examples'
viewtopic.php?t=14

'False memories and the "misinformation effect"'
viewtopic.php?t=1995
If it can't happen as alleged, then it didn't.

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Re: Basketball star Ray Allen praised for Auschwitz visit and essay

Postby Sannhet » 2 months 6 days ago (Thu Aug 10, 2017 10:38 am)

Hektor wrote:Does this Basketball star have a social media presence?

Here is some Twitter activity in reaction to the tweeting of Ray Allen's Holocaust essay by the Players Tribune webzine (which has 510,000 Twitter followers) this week. the Holocaust Enforcement industry has been retweeting it, as can be seen from some of the replies (some read the Tweet through a retweet from @AuschwitzMuseum):

528 Retweets
945 Likes
66 Response Tweets -- of which about 50 are from unique accounts (a few of which are 'trolls'), and about 16 are multiple tweets from one account, mainly from a pro-Palestinian activist who believes in the Holocaust (a Mirnes Halimic, @MirnesTheGreat).

Selected responses (note that anyone can post a responding Tweet which appears below the main Tweet; therefore, Twitter conversations are to a great extent a 'free for all'):


Praising Ray Allen / mainly Holocaust Believers, many of whom have Jewish-seeming names :
LFrombach‏ @laura_frombach Aug 6

You area true hero, sir.
j. hirsch‏ @jhirsch99 Aug 5

Your ancestors are very proud of you, Ray.
Paul Berebitsky‏ @PaulBerebitsky Aug 5

Great reading. U should visit Candles Museum in TerreHaute IN, run by Eva Korr, an Auschwitz survivor.
A. Feldman‏ @AFeldman2 Aug 5

Thank you for this. We're all in this together

[link to an article "Skin in the Game: How Antisemitism Animates White Nationalism"]
Barry Shapiro‏ @barryshap Aug 5

He was always a gentleman on the court. He classed up the Celtics. And, with this moving piece, shows his true character. Thank you Ray!
memoryisourhome‏ @memoryisourhome Aug 3

There is no end to our stories, more than 1 million Holocaust victims still unaccounted for, as if they never even existed.


In some way critical of Ray Allen for publishing this Holocaust essay:
Mirnes Halimic‏ @MirnesTheGreat Aug 4

Hey Ray I agree everyone should visit Auschwitz if they are able to but I also suggest you go visit Gaza.......
Applied Logic‏ @appliedlogicTV Aug 4

Auschwitz was a synthetic rubber plant, no one was ever gassed there.
Ty AKA Ghostbuster‏ @MRbluCLouds Aug 3

Have u gone 2 some places where ur ancestors were burned nd hanged??? Or r we just doin this 4 Jew status?

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Re: Basketball star Ray Allen praised for Auschwitz visit and essay

Postby Sannhet » 2 months 6 days ago (Thu Aug 10, 2017 11:00 am)

A second tweeting of the Ray Allen Auschwitz essay on Aug 3 by the Players Tribune Twitter account had the tagline: "We have to do a better job breaking through ignorance and the close-mindedness... plaguing our society in 2017."

Image

This one has, as of this writing:
554 Retweets
1,041 Likes
21 Responses

Selected responses, starting with a critical one from an apparent Black racialist:
Courage Under Fire‏ @anthemprotest Aug 7

[Part 1] It is disappointing to see our stars caping for others when we continue to suffer, and the sentiment is not reciprocated. Unacceptable. [Part 2] To subordinate our pain and esteem another's who, due to their whiteness, have been compensated. Even had a museum here DECADES before us.
Richie Hero‏ @RichieHero7 Aug 6

This is fantastic, and much respect to Ray. But 11 million people died, not 6. 6 million Jews. Hopefully someone can tell him.
Eli Boro‏ @Mate58 Aug 5

Ray Allen I applaud you!!!! You are what the world needs to look to!!!!
Ken Cutler‏ @cuts47 Aug 4

This is very moving. What a guy. His message is right. We too often separate ourselves now into our tribes.
Mark Claflin‏ @markclaflin Aug 3

What a great article.
I had also read all the books and seen all the documentaries but in Auschwitz was hit by the heavy atmosphere.

And also this exchange, which implicates the Auschwitz Museum staff in this affair. The Twitter user calling himself "aw," in reference to the promotional picture for the essay:
ray allen.jpg
ray allen.jpg (31.49 KiB) Viewed 330 times

aw‏ @_a__w_ Aug 3

That's an interesting quote to put with a picture of him wearing headphones....
Auschwitz Memorial‏ [Verified account] @AuschwitzMuseum Aug 3

He was listening to the guide's explanation whole visiting the Memorial.

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Re: Basketball star Ray Allen praised for Auschwitz visit and essay

Postby Sannhet » 2 months 6 days ago (Thu Aug 10, 2017 11:12 am)

Hannover wrote:Ray Allen, at the end of his career, could be sucking up for a lucrative TV sports gig.

Good point. Although Ray Allen played his last NBA game in June 2014, I failed to notice this little section of his Wiki:
Retirement
[Ray] Allen became a free agent in the 2014 off-season [summer 2014], and after much anticipation of a return at some point during the 2014–15 season, he announced his decision to sit out the season and focus on 2015–16.[36] However, he did not end up joining a team for the 2015–16 season. In July 2016, Allen began mulling a comeback, and admitted he was "intrigued" by the possibility of competing for another championship.[37] The following month, Allen had talks with the Boston Celtics and the Milwaukee Bucks regarding a possible return,[38] but ultimately decided to officially retire from the game on November 1, 2016.[39]
So he was actively trying to get back on an NBA team until late 2016. His Auschwitz visit seems to have been sometime between November and March, as we see him wearing winter clothing. See his article and pictures here: "Ray Allen: Why I Went to Auschwitz" (2017).

In other words, within months or perhaps weeks of announcing final retirement from playing professional basketball, he is in Auschwitz.

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Re: Basketball star Ray Allen praised for Auschwitz visit and essay

Postby Hannover » 2 months 6 days ago (Thu Aug 10, 2017 11:37 am)

Now this is telling:
Richie Hero‏ @RichieHero7 Aug 6

This is fantastic, and much respect to Ray. But 11 million people died, not 6. 6 million Jews. Hopefully someone can tell him.

This religious wingnut doubles down on the kabbalistic "6" with "6.6 million".

No doubt, it is a religion and an immensely profitable fraud.

Jews have been marketing the '6,000,000' lie since at least 1869.

Image
see:
http://balder.org/judea/New-York-Times- ... e-1869.php


- Hannover

"Some stories are true that never happened."
- Elie Wiesel
If it can't happen as alleged, then it didn't.

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Re: Basketball star Ray Allen praised for Auschwitz visit and essay

Postby Sannhet » 2 months 5 days ago (Fri Aug 11, 2017 10:48 pm)

a series of replies to the Ray Allen Visit Auschwitz tweets:
Applied Logic‏ @appliedlogicTV Aug 4

Auschwitz was a synthetic rubber plant, no one was ever gassed there.
SDL‏ @SweDiscoLovers Aug 4

Except my great-grandmother was. Feel free calling my great-grandfather and ask about it, he witnessed her being dragged to the chambers.
Applied Logic‏ @appliedlogicTV Aug 4

Heard it all before, yet no ash or Zyklon B apart from the delousing rooms which is what it was used for.. These are just straight facts
Jake‏ @jakeds18 Aug 7

No they are myths that have been debunked again and again and again. Go play with Irving

A glance at @appliedlogicTV's tweets shows that all or very near all of his twitter activity is about sports. He found the Ray Allen in Auschwitz tweet through a retweet by Dwyane Wade (b. 1982) (@DwyaneWade) (yes, that is the right spelling), another basketball player and former teammate of Ray Allen's.


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