Rare piano that survived Holocaust awaits restoration in Philadelphia

Read and post various viewpoints or search our large archives.

Moderator: Moderator

Forum rules
Be sure to read the Rules/guidelines before you post!
User avatar
Sannhet
Valuable asset
Valuable asset
Posts: 835
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2004 6:12 pm
Location: USA

Rare piano that survived Holocaust awaits restoration in Philadelphia

Postby Sannhet » 2 months 5 days ago (Wed Feb 03, 2021 9:30 am)

Rare piano that survived Holocaust awaits restoration in South Philly, and a fourth-generation home

Unlike many of its kind, the Ibach was successfully extracted from Nazi Germany in 1936.

Tom Rudnitsky with Frank-Bauer family piano that survived Holocaust.jpg

by Michaela Winberg
Jan. 31, 2021 | BillyPenn.com WHYY News

The piano has seen better days. With a cracked soundboard, buzzy strings, and weathered finish, the baby grand lying on its side in a Bok building studio is in need of some serious love.

It has seen worse. Crafted by Germany’s Ibach Piano Company some hundred years ago, the instrument is taking a breath in South Philly after nearly getting destroyed during the Holocaust.

In 1936, the piano traveled 4,000 miles, escaping the grasp of the Third Reich to land near Philadelphia. Many human members of the family didn’t survive to make the same pilgrimage. Almost all other furniture and heirlooms were forever lost.

Okay, so a family shipped a piano to America in 1936. Tell me in what way was it "nearly destroyed in the Holocaust"? :?

But the 88 keys made it here. Their journey from Germany to Delaware County was facilitated by renowned anti-Nazi lawyer Hans J. Frank, whose sister owned the piano. Without Frank’s help, she might not have made it out before the war — and the Ibach would likely have been demolished by Hitler’s regime, like so many others.

Who knew that part of the Holocaust involved destroying Jewish pianos? (They do make one insinuation about piano destruction -- piano extermination? -- "during the Holocaust" late in the article, but they leave out something very important; see below.)

“You don’t see pianos like this,” said Tom Rudnitsky of Philatuner, who is tasked with fixing it up. “Not with this sort of monumental, world-shaking trauma embedded.”

Good boy, Tom Rudnitsky. You said your lines right.

This piano has world-shaking trauma. "Don't show me any pianos from Rwanda 1994! They're just not...world-shaking enough."

With a worn, matte black exterior, the instrument shows its history, but is still visually stunning. Its cast iron plate is hand carved with intricate golden flowers. Each string is hand-coiled, ready to produce an impressively dense wall of sound.

In the hands of third-generation owners, the piano sat in Bucks County for the past several decades, virtually unplayable. Raising a family of four, Eric and Tami Brauer couldn’t undertake a full restoration.

“When you’re raising a family, there’s always something else to spend $10,000 or $20,000 on,” said Tami.

When the couple split up recently, the piano became a priority. As she was downsizing to an apartment four months ago, Tami called Rudnitsky to ask if he could make it playable again. When the work is complete, it’ll make another pilgrimage — this time to the suburbs of D.C., where the Brauers’ son will take ownership and teach his daughter to play.

“For 30 years, it kind of sat there,” Tami said. “Now it’s getting a new life.”

At one level this is an almost comically mundane story about an old piano. Worth attention for how mundane it is.

Maybe the piano's history has some kind of interest to someone -- surely it does to the owners' families themselves -- but this is a news website serving 1.6 million Philadelphia residents and 4.5 million more outside the city proper but in the Greater Philadelphia region.

(A 2019 study found 351,000 Jews in Greater Philadelphia, which is an impressive 5.5--6% of total; the number goes to around 450,000 if including defacto assimilated Jews via non-Jewish-origin spouses and children of Jews not being raised Jewish; potentially putting the broadest figure as high as 7.5%.)

So I am thinking about how this works: Do we take any mundane thing/story/fact/object/person, add in the word 'Holocaust,' attach it to 1930s European-Jews, and the thing/story/object/person takes on a magical, religious-like quality, to which people like Tom Rudnitsky have to "bow and scrape"?

Unless Rudnitsky himself is Jewish, in which case he's probably "in" on the whole thing, aware of the consensus to treat this old piano like a sacred Holocaust relic (even though it was shipped out of Europe years before the Holocaust, but that's another matter).

According to wikipedia, there are many Jews named Rudnitsky or Rudnicki. It was even Holocaust scholar Yitzak Arad's birth name. At the end of the article we learn this about Rudnitsky: "His grandmother grew up in Ukraine and barely made it out of the Soviet regime in time." (In time for what?)

The original owner of the enduring instrument was classically trained pianist Heidi Frank. She married into the Brauer family, who owned a hat company in Germany.

Her brother Frank, the lawyer, fled Germany in 1933, then made a name for himself helping Jewish people get their property back after World War II.

To help his relatives escape, Frank facilitated a trade between the Brauers’ hat company and a German family that owned a few beauty salons in Upper Darby [a small city near Philadelphia in Delaware County, Pennsylvania]. The business owners switched places — with the Brauers moving to [Delaware County, Pennsylvania] to run the salons, and the other family moving back to Germany and taking over hat manufacturing for a few years.

A pregnant Heidi, along with her husband and their son, managed to arrive in the United States unscathed.

Sidney Brauer was the baby on the way. Now 84 years old, he lives in Warwick, Pa., with fond memories of the piano. It was essential to his musically inclined mother — so much so that she chose it among the few items she could take with her to her new home.

“They were very lucky that it didn’t get scratched,” Sidney said, his voice tinged with reverence. “It never did.”

There is more content in the article I am not copying, but this portion is rich:

It’s a rarity for an Ibach brand to be in America in the first place, because so many didn’t make it out of Nazi Germany. One of the Ibach factories was burned to the ground during the war — and the company shut down in 1980.

How did the factory "burn to the ground"? (How many total factories were there? How many more were produced between the Wiederaufbau period and 1980 when the company shut down?) It sounds like the factory may have been bombed. It was a factory in Germany, after all! Off-narrative; don't mention the agent/actor who caused the 'burning to the ground.'

So the article tells us of a piano shipped to the US by wealthy Jews in 1936 and then leaves us with a dagger of a passively constructed sentence: "One of the Ibach factories was burned to the ground during the war" without telling us how it burned. Passive sentences are sneaky because the reader inserts an agent subconsciously. Many will be forgiven for guessing that maybe Hitler sent brownshirts to burn the factory down and ordered them to cream anti-Semitic slogans and beating up Jews along the way.

The restoration will be a lengthy project. The triple-coiled, hand-woven strings will have to be remade from scratch.

“I’m kind of sighing as I look at this, because this is gonna be like, two, three days of work just making loops,” Rudnitsky said. “That’s all I’m going to do for three days.” As he works, the instrument reminds him of his own family’s struggle: his grandmother grew up in Ukraine and barely made it out of the Soviet regime in time.

For Eric Brauer, it’s a reminder of the hard choices forced in the face of tyranny — and how sometimes, art and music are an important part of surviving hate.

“When you see people storm the Capitol, you see how fragile democracy can be,” Eric said. “The piano is a bit of a metaphor for what can be.”

These are the last lines of the article.

What a segue! The piano a metaphor for Fighting Hate. Of course it is. The Holocaust-surviving piano shows the way on the need to suppress protestors in election disputes. :shock: :o

User avatar
borjastick
Valuable asset
Valuable asset
Posts: 2841
Joined: Fri Aug 26, 2011 5:52 am
Location: Europe

Re: Rare piano that survived Holocaust awaits restoration in Philadelphia

Postby borjastick » 2 months 4 days ago (Wed Feb 03, 2021 10:10 am)

I feel a bit off key.

Something about this story doesn't ring true...
'Of the four million Jews under Nazi control in WW2, six million died and alas only five million survived.'

'We don't need evidence, we have survivors' - israeli politician

User avatar
Lamprecht
Valuable asset
Valuable asset
Posts: 2374
Joined: Sun Nov 30, 2008 6:32 pm

Re: Rare piano that survived Holocaust awaits restoration in Philadelphia

Postby Lamprecht » 2 months 4 days ago (Wed Feb 03, 2021 10:55 am)

Can it be, Mengele's dog's infamous piano? :roll:
A survivor's story casts a new perspective on this issue. In an article in Israeli newspaper, Ha-Aretz, a doctoral student relates the story of her mother who survived Auschwitz because of the latter's musical talents. The infamous Dr. Mengele, medical director of that camp, is well-known for the medical experiments which he performed on concentration camp inmates. These included such "scientific" inquiries as the length of time a man can survive being submerged in freezing water, which level of torture causes unconsciousness; how small children react to physical mutilations, and the like.

What is less known about Mengele, at least until this article was published, is that he was a devotee of classical music. In fact, in the same building known as "the experimentation block" there was a "music room" in which he would indulge his talent of violin playing. When the above-mentioned woman arrived at Auschwitz, Mengele noted in her record that she was a pianist and asked her to perform for him. He was so impressed with her talents that he decided to give her special treatment, a privilege that ultimately spared her life.

In addition to the usual slave labor to which all inmates were subjected, this woman had to perform periodically for Mengele, often while the latter would accompany her on his violin. In particular, the article relates, he loved to have her play Shubert's "Serenade" and the religious hymn, "Ave Maria."

So important was music to Mengele, that he trained one of his dogs to be sensitive to every nuance of his favorite compositions. If ever the woman would play a note inaccurately, the dog would pounce on her and viciously bite her. This happened many times when she was forced to perform before Mengele when she was unable to concentrate fully on her playing, such as after she had contracted tuberculosis.

She had at least ten scars all over her body resulting from dog-bites incurred by lapses in her performance.
Read more: viewtopic.php?p=91276#p91276
"There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which is proof against all arguments, and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance -- that principle is contempt prior to investigation."
— Herbert Spencer

User avatar
Wachtman
Member
Member
Posts: 41
Joined: Fri Nov 27, 2020 12:53 pm

Re: Rare piano that survived Holocaust awaits restoration in Philadelphia

Postby Wachtman » 2 months 4 days ago (Wed Feb 03, 2021 6:27 pm)

Wouldn't it have survived the fire-bombings? Or did they force it into the showers and the water almost destroyed it?!

User avatar
stinky
Valued contributor
Valued contributor
Posts: 288
Joined: Fri Feb 02, 2018 10:59 pm

Re: Rare piano that survived Holocaust awaits restoration in Philadelphia

Postby stinky » 2 months 4 days ago (Wed Feb 03, 2021 10:06 pm)

Sannhet wrote:Who knew that part of the Holocaust involved destroying Jewish pianos? (They do make one insinuation about piano destruction -- piano extermination? -- "during the Holocaust"


You didn't know that the Nazi's had a plan to to destroy all Jewish pianos?
This fact was established at Nuremberg by judicial notice.

Sannhet wrote:So I am thinking about how this works: Do we take any mundane thing/story/fact/object/person, add in the word 'Holocaust,' attach it to 1930s European-Jews, and the thing/story/object/person takes on a magical, religious-like quality, to which people like Tom Rudnitsky have to "bow and scrape"?

Yes. That is exactly how it works.

“When you see people storm the Capitol, you see how fragile democracy can be,” Eric said. “The piano is a bit of a metaphor for what can be.”


As for the end of the article - triple-points-additional-hoax-slam-dunk!
Bravo!
It's easier to fool someone than to convince them that they have been fooled

Breker
Valuable asset
Valuable asset
Posts: 888
Joined: Thu May 18, 2006 5:39 pm
Location: Europa

Re: Rare piano that survived Holocaust awaits restoration in Philadelphia

Postby Breker » 2 months 4 days ago (Wed Feb 03, 2021 11:10 pm)

Wow! How ominous! I have an old cuckoo clock in my house made in Germany in the 1930s, so it too "survived the Holocaust".
We believe the intention here was to weave that piano into 'The Pianist' movie propaganda.
Insanity is not supposed to be funny, but the insanity we're witnessing truly is.
And then we see:
When you see people storm the Capitol, you see how fragile democracy can be,"

Which was absolutely small fry when compared to the massive, months long violence, murder, and destruction by racist BLM and Antifa.
Zionists and the Left didn't say a word when their protestors assaulted the US Capitol, the US Supreme Court and engaged in an "insurrection", or when they attacked, and burned police stations, federal buildings, churches, engaged in massive violence, murdered people, and looted businesses.



ImageImageImageImage

Don’t Fall For The Establishment’s Tall Tales. There is Abundant Evidence of Electoral Fraud:
https://www.lewrockwell.com/2021/01/pau ... ral-fraud/
B.
Revisionists are just the messengers, the impossibility of the "Holocaust" narrative is the message.

User avatar
Wachtman
Member
Member
Posts: 41
Joined: Fri Nov 27, 2020 12:53 pm

Re: Rare piano that survived Holocaust awaits restoration in Philadelphia

Postby Wachtman » 2 months 4 days ago (Thu Feb 04, 2021 6:18 am)

Did they throw the baby-grands into the air and catch them on their bayonets?

User avatar
Sannhet
Valuable asset
Valuable asset
Posts: 835
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2004 6:12 pm
Location: USA

Re: Rare piano that survived Holocaust awaits restoration in Philadelphia

Postby Sannhet » 2 months 3 days ago (Thu Feb 04, 2021 12:18 pm)

Breker wrote:We believe the intention here was to weave that piano into 'The Pianist' movie propaganda.

This is a great point. I never did see The Pianist which may be one reason I missed this connection.

Here is a CODOH-Forum thread from December 2003 with people's reactions to The Pianist: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=697

The Pianist made waves in 2002 in film festivals but was only released in the US in a limited way around Christmas 2002. It took some big prizes at the "Oscars" in March 2003 not long after the initial US invasion of Iraq. The left-wing activist and documentary guy Michael Moore made some kind of protest and others booed him for speaking against the war. The star of The Pianist Holocaust movie, Adrien Brody, was seen shaking his head and smirking at Moore, basically mocking him. After its slew of awards, it got a full theater release in the US and did very well, I think, upon its release to DVD in late May 2003. I can only imagine how many people have seen it in the past 19 years.

That CODOH-Forum thread from Dec. 2003 includes someone writing under the name "Guptalicious" saying this, relevant to the geopolitics of the time:
any movie having to do with the Warsaw ghetto is going to have to have obligatory dialog about "this time we have to fight" and sure enough the ad campaign for the movie had just such snippets of dialog. And naturally one expects such dialog to be used to justify everything from taking over all of Area A to invading Iraq.

Adrien Brody, Holocaust-movie star, mocking Michael Moore for protesting the war also poetically fits, perfectly.

And then we see the final line of this Holocaust Piano article about the "evil people who invaded the US Capitol building." It seems more than a little similar.

User avatar
Sannhet
Valuable asset
Valuable asset
Posts: 835
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2004 6:12 pm
Location: USA

Re: Rare piano that survived Holocaust awaits restoration in Philadelphia

Postby Sannhet » 1 month 3 weeks ago (Sun Feb 14, 2021 10:18 am)

US radio listeners were treated to this Holocaust Piano story today in the NPR program "Weekend Edition," which is said to have a listenership in the millions. NPR is a taxpayer-funded national news radio broadcaster in the USA.

Via NPR: https://www.npr.org/2021/02/14/96780720 ... d-to-glory. Also posted to Twitter.

A Rare Piano That Escaped The Holocaust Gets Restored To Glory
February 14, 2021 | 8:00 AM ET

Heard on "Weekend Edition Sunday"

MICHAELA WINBERG

The innovative Ibach baby grand, brought from Germany in the 1930s by a Jewish family fleeing the Nazis, sat unplayable for decades. That's about to change, thanks to the family's grandchildren.

[3-minute Listen] - streaming at link https://www.npr.org/2021/02/14/96780720 ... d-to-glory

Tom Rudnitsky, the heroic piano tuner who bowed and scraped before the magic of the Holocaust-surviving Piano, gets interviewed for this. He lamely says pianos were the "Tesla" of the 1880s-to-1920s. He uses several verbal shibboleths of someone on the Left.

The reporter, Michaela Winberg (born ca.1996), I assume is Jewish. She uses "vocal fry."

In any case, the exact same 'branding' as the local-news story out of Philadelphia two weeks ago; it was passed up from the junior-league to the big-league with the semi-absurd meme intact. A "piano that narrowly survived the Holocaust" (whatever that means) has now been beamed to millions of pairs of ears. Narrative reinforcement. Narrative management. Anything will do, really. The power of the Holocaust in our culture, demonstrated.

User avatar
Lamprecht
Valuable asset
Valuable asset
Posts: 2374
Joined: Sun Nov 30, 2008 6:32 pm

Re: Rare piano that survived Holocaust awaits restoration in Philadelphia

Postby Lamprecht » 1 month 3 weeks ago (Sun Feb 14, 2021 10:52 am)

Sannhet wrote:A "piano that narrowly survived the Holocaust" (whatever that means)

Indeed, the piano did not survive the Second World War, but "The Holocaust."
It appears as though the Germans not only had a plan to kill every Jew, Gypsy, Jehova's Witness, and homosexual that they could get their hands on... but also musical instruments. Possibly they had made enough lampshades, soap, and furniture from gassed Jews that they decided to use their bodies to make instruments as well. :roll:
"There is a principle which is a bar against all information, which is proof against all arguments, and which cannot fail to keep a man in everlasting ignorance -- that principle is contempt prior to investigation."
— Herbert Spencer

User avatar
Sannhet
Valuable asset
Valuable asset
Posts: 835
Joined: Mon Mar 08, 2004 6:12 pm
Location: USA

Re: Rare piano that survived Holocaust awaits restoration in Philadelphia

Postby Sannhet » 1 month 3 weeks ago (Mon Feb 15, 2021 11:21 am)

Breker wrote:Wow! How ominous! I have an old cuckoo clock in my house made in Germany in the 1930s, so it too "survived the Holocaust".

Philadelphia journalist Danya Henninger (born ca.1974, New York City origin, Holocaust-ancestry) says she owns a grandfather clock which also survived the gas chambers:

Danya Henninger - grandfather clock survived Holocaust.png
https://twitter.com/phillydesign/status ... 0709306368
Danya Henninger @phillydesign
Jan 31, 2021

My grandmother made it out of Nazi Germany with a beautiful grandfather clock. This family was able to save their Ibach piano.

Lovely story about music and family by @mwinberg_


Return to “'Holocaust' Debate / Controversies / Comments / News”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: JohnDemianiuk and 2 guests