Railroad rails in fires

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Carto's Cutlass Supreme
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Postby Carto's Cutlass Supreme » 1 decade 4 years ago (Wed Sep 21, 2005 1:13 pm)

That's not what I remember reading. I read about it at UKAR.ORG where Lubomyr Prytulak has an excellent article on this.

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Postby Vallon » 1 decade 4 years ago (Wed Sep 21, 2005 2:56 pm)

Carto's Cutlass Supreme wrote:That's not what I remember reading. I read about it at UKAR.ORG where Lubomyr Prytulak has an excellent article on this.
I think Prytulaks' open letter to Sereny is rather insinuant:
http://www.ukar.org/sereny02.html

My source is chapter 5 of Sereny's "The German Trauma", previously published in Daily Telegraph Magazine of October 1971. (Stangl had died June 28.)

I do not have the English version, I will try to translate back the last paragraph:
Nineteen hours later Franz Stangl died of heart failure. On a note on the wall he had written a name he had tried to remember for our conversation the next day. There was perfect order on his desk: correspondence, photographs, legal papers, and notes in his neat and compressed handwriting. The book from the prison library that he was reading when he dies was Jozef Pilsudski's Laws and Honour.

Carto's Cutlass Supreme
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Postby Carto's Cutlass Supreme » 1 decade 4 years ago (Wed Sep 21, 2005 3:55 pm)

Thanks Vallon: I guess either Sereni is lying or she isn't. As a revisionist, I think she is. I wonder, as Prytulak asks, if she taped the interviews.

Back to the railroad rails. I'm no metallurgist, but isn't my frying pan made out of steel? Is steel always the choice for railroad rails? What about iron? What do barbecues use for a grill? They never bend. I'm not sure what's what here! lol.

If one studies modern architecture, the early European buildings look really nice, if you're into that sort of thing, because it's all glass and metal. The problem was that metal buckles in fire heat, so the United States made rules that steel had to be encapsulated in concrete. Hence American modern architecture is all concrete and glass.

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Postby Vallon » 1 decade 4 years ago (Wed Sep 21, 2005 4:44 pm)

Carto's Cutlass Supreme wrote:Thanks Vallon: I guess either Sereni is lying or she isn't. As a revisionist, I think she is. I wonder, as Prytulak asks, if she taped the interviews.
I think she just wrote what Stangl told her. He was not a revisionist either. In court, he did not deny having been the boss of Treblinka.

"German Trauma" has a picture of Stangl and Sereny sitting at the table. There is no tape recorder there, just an ash tray. Sereny is holding a cigaret in her left hand, while she is making notes with her right hand.
Back to the railroad rails. I'm no metallurgist, but isn't my frying pan made out of steel? Is steel always the choice for railroad rails? What about iron? What do barbecues use for a grill? They never bend. I'm not sure what's what here!
Railway rails are made out of steel. That is the kind of high-carbon steel that made constructions like the Eiffel tower possible after the invention of the Bessemer proces.

Steel starts sagging under load when it becomes red hot (600 degrees C = 1100 F). Of course it depends on the load and the construction how fast it will sag.

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Postby Scott » 1 decade 4 years ago (Wed Sep 21, 2005 6:28 pm)

Carto's Cutlass Supreme wrote:Back to the railroad rails. I'm no metallurgist, but isn't my frying pan made out of steel?


A frying pan is probably made out of cast iron unless it is stainless steel. Cast iron is cheap but brittle. A frying pan is not subject to the kinds of loads that would be the case with locomotive rails, nor the heat of cremation. A frying pan might also be made out of aluminum, which is a soft metal and has a lower melting point than iron but conducts heat better, which makes it good for cooking. Aluminum is more expensive than iron but very lightweight.

Carto's Cutlass Supreme wrote:If one studies modern architecture, the early European buildings look really nice, if you're into that sort of thing, because it's all glass and metal. The problem was that metal buckles in fire heat, so the United States made rules that steel had to be encapsulated in concrete. Hence American modern architecture is all concrete and glass.


The steel is used to reinforce the concrete not vice-versa. Concrete is cheap but brittle without reinforcement. Structures can be made very, very strong with reinforced concrete, but the design has to allow for flexing of the structures and thermal changes to prevent cracking. Some parking garages, for example, shake like an earthquake when cars are going up and down them. They are designed to flex that way so that the materials do not get stressed, and they usually have special joints for that purpose. You can see these expansion joints on bridges too.

:D

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Postby Bergmann » 1 decade 4 years ago (Thu Sep 22, 2005 7:52 am)

Vilho wrote:What did they use to get the bodies in Dresden etc. to burn?

Probably gasoline. If the resulting temperature is high enough, the fat of the human bodies will start to burn. The skull, bones and rib cage will probably remain and not be cremated this way.


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