'Germans concealed alleged gas chambers with opera'

Read and post various viewpoints or search our large archives.

Moderator: Moderator

Forum rules
Be sure to read the Rules/guidelines before you post!
User avatar
Hannover
Valuable asset
Valuable asset
Posts: 9911
Joined: Sun Nov 24, 2002 7:53 pm

'Germans concealed alleged gas chambers with opera'

Postby Hannover » 1 decade 2 years ago (Mon Feb 26, 2007 12:01 pm)

This is so ridiculous that I have barely stopped laughing. It should read:
'How the Public was Conned into Believing the Ridiculous and Impossible'.

In an increasingly desperate attempt to support the '6,000,000 Jews, 6,000,000 others, and gas chambers' Big Lie, we see what can only described as embarrassing and bizarre. Continued attempts to rationalize an impossible storyline inevitably lead to the ridiculous.

Read on, this is filled with goodies which an informed, rational mind will see right through.

- Hannover
Brundibar: How The Nazis Conned The World

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2007/02/ ... 8458.shtml

Feb. 25, 2007(CBS) How did the Nazis manage to kill six million Jews and keep so much of the world in the dark? Part of the answer can be found when looking at the history of a concentration camp called Theresienstadt, in what was Czechoslovakia. Near the end of the war, the Nazis used the camp to con the world.

Reports had begun circulating in allied capitals that the Nazis were exterminating Jews. The Nazis wanted to refute those reports, so they took this one camp and turned it, if ever so briefly, into a model town. They shot a movie there to prove how good they treated the Jews and invited the Red Cross to inspect it.

Central to the deception was the performance of a children's opera called "Brundibar." The opera survived the war and so did a few members of its cast. They are in their mid-70s now and a few months ago, they invited 60 Minutes correspondent Bob Simon to spend some time with them.


Every summer, a remarkable reunion takes place in the Czech Republic. A group of friends come together from all over the world, who all have one thing in common: they grew up in the shadow of death in a concentration camp in the lush mountains outside of Prague. They grew up quickly.

Helga Kinsky couldn’t speak about the horror for a full 40 years. "Because actually whatever you did, you didn't have the right to live. You were sentenced to death. And it is something you can't get over," she explains.

The survivors' friendship began in Theresienstadt, a transit camp. From here, a garrison town before the war, Jews were sent off to the gas chambers of Auschwitz. Nearly 140,000 Jews from all over central Europe passed through the camp, including many of Europe’s most prominent artists who left a record of what it was like. Much of the art has survived, some of it by children. They portrayed how cold and crowded they were, sleeping 30 to a room, how typhus epidemics swept through the camp. The dead were brought to catacombs before being incinerated. Bodies were carried on the same wagons used for bread. Jews weren’t gassed at Theresienstadt but more than 30,000 died of disease and hunger.

Music flourished in the camp—it was like a Julliard for Jews. There were classes and concerts in cellars and attics. The hottest ticket in town was Brundibar, written by a Czech Jew and smuggled into the camp.

"It wasn't easy to get tickets," remembers Dita Krause, who was in the choir in Brundibar. She says tickets were printed for every performance and were maybe the most difficult to get.

The opera was performed 55 times by children in Theresienstadt. It’s a fairy tale of sorts, the story of a young brother and sister who with the help of a cat, a dog, a bird and the children of the village defeat an evil organ grinder named Brundibar. The opera ends with a victory song.

Back in the camp, the Nazis filmed the performance in 1944. The lead role, the part of Brundibar, was played by a boy named Honza Treichlinger, who wore a fake mustache.

"Everybody loved him. And everybody adored him," remembers Ella Weissberger, who played the cat.

"I wore my sisters ski pants and my mothers sweater. Black sweater, this was my costume," she recalls.

Wearing a costume was a relief from what Ella and the other kids had to wear all the time in the camp. "This was the only time that they said we don’t have to put on the Jewish star. A couple of minutes of freedom," she explains.

A couple of minutes of freedom for Ella the cat.
"All I can hear and see is Ella, never stopping to sing the cat. So we all sang the cat in the end," remembers Eva Gross, who was 20 at the time. She taught the children.

"It was lovely this was very nice, very liberating. Very—and of course the whole—not only the whole room, the whole house, the whole town sang the victory song afterwards," Gross remembers.

The whole town was mesmerized by the opera, the story of an evil man with a mustache. An evil man with a moustache? Did the kids have any idea what the opera was really about?

"Oh, yes, they knew exactly the symbolic meaning. I'm sure they did. The whole thing was of course symbolic, you know? Brundibar was Hitler. So, oh yes, they knew," says Gross.

"It was our way to fight the evil. The Germans, maybe," says Handa Drori, who was a member of the chorus. Once, she got a chance to play the dog.

Brundibar is a story of defiance.

Asked if the Germans didn't realize that or whether they worried about it, Drori tells Simon, "Yeah that what we wondered all the time. If they don't understand that what we are singing is against them. If they don't understand it. Or if they just don't care, because they knew what we didn't know. That we are meant all to go to the gas chambers and to die, not to survive. Maybe they thought, 'Ah let the Jews play a little bit before they go to be, to be killed.'"

But by 1944 reports were circulating in allied capitals that Jews were being deported and exterminated.

The Nazis wanted to refute those reports and decided on an audacious deception: to make Theresienstadt look like a model Jewish town and to invite in the International Red Cross for an inspection and to make a propaganda film showing what a nice place it was.

A beautification plan was implemented immediately. They painted buildings, planted flowers, opened stores, and put up a bandstand in the town square.

They built a kindergarten in a small park, near our children's home. They opened a coffee shop. And those chose the people who sit there. And listen to music, and drink their coffee. Usually young, pretty women. They made Terezin into a beautiful, little place," remembers Helga Kinsky, who watched it all unfold.

And they made it a lot less crowded. Just before the Red Cross delegation arrived, the Nazis shipped 7,500 people off to Auschwitz, creating more open spaces. The stage was now set. On June 23rd, 1944, the Red Cross delegates came for their one day visit and the show began. The Nazis decided that a performance of Brundibar would be the highlight.

Paul Sandfort was in the orchestra that day and played the trumpet.

Asked what that particular performance was like, Sandfort tells Simon, "It was a little more tense. A little more tense because we had to…this feeling of…I at least has the feeling you must not fail. You must play for your life."

The Red Cross delegates went exactly where the Nazis took them. They didn’t question a single prisoner. They saw no evil, they heard no evil. In fact, the Swiss head of the delegation took pictures to show how happy the children looked.

The deception worked. The final report of the Red Cross delegation read that Theresienstadt looks like a normal provincial town where and the "elegantly dressed women all had silk stockings scarves and stylish handbags." The delegates also wrote that Theresienstadt is a final destination camp and that people who come here are not sent elsewhere.

In fact by the time of the visit, some 68,000 people had already been shipped from here to the death camps.

Sandfort acknowledges the Nazis did convince the world. "But they only convinced the world because the world wanted to be convinced. It's easier."
When the show was over, the transports to Auschwitz were accelerated.
Those who stayed behind, like Ella Weissberger, watched as their friends and fellow cast members were herded onto the trains.

"So I tell you the truth, when we were saying the last goodbye to some I can't say it today. I said, 'But I will see you later. I don't wanna say goodbye,'" she says.

As the trains kept on heading to Auschwitz, the cast of Brundibar kept on changing. Ella’s co-star Honza Treichlinger, the young boy who played Brundibar, was sent to the gas chambers in 1944. The opera’s composer, Hans Krasa, was killed about the same time.

For those who stayed in Theresienstadt it meant learning new parts all the time, which wasn’t a problem because everyone knew the opera by heart. But by the end of 1944, performances stopped abruptly because there was hardly anyone left.

Dita Krause was 12 when she was bundled onto a train to Auschwitz. "For me the Holocaust started after Terezin. Terezin was still acceptable compared to what was after. The day we left Terezin, the world changed totally, radically," she explains.

Like very few other cast members of Brundibar, Dita survived Auschwitz and Bergen Belsen, but she lost her entire family and almost all her friends. "So few of them survived. And they were so talented. So many wonderful children among them, and promising children. That's the pity of it. Children that would have become poets and artists, and so many of them. And they are all gone, for nothing," she tells Simon.

The cast members of Brundibar who did survive get together every year now. This past autumn they walked around Theresienstadt, that old concentration camp, which is now a provincial town again.

Children from all over the world perform Brundibar these days, this fairy tale set to music. Children from a nearby Czech school put on a performance for members of the original cast in the same Theresienstadt attic where they first performed it more than 60 years ago.

The girls, as they still call themselves, remembered their lines. The schoolchildren invited them to join in the finale, the victory song. They stole the show.
Last edited by Hannover on Mon Feb 26, 2007 2:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
If it can't happen as alleged, then it didn't.

User avatar
Hannover
Valuable asset
Valuable asset
Posts: 9911
Joined: Sun Nov 24, 2002 7:53 pm

Postby Hannover » 1 decade 2 years ago (Mon Feb 26, 2007 1:56 pm)

Helga Kinsky couldn’t speak about the horror for a full 40 years. "Because actually whatever you did, you didn't have the right to live. You were sentenced to death. And it is something you can't get over," she explains.

Right, so 'sentenced to death' that she is alive.

'Couldn't speak' or didn't speak? Maybe after being told lie after lie, having words put into her mouth so that now she feels there's something in it for her. An enabling process.
They are in their mid-70s now and a few months ago, they invited 60 Minutes correspondent Bob Simon to spend some time with them.

Sure, I can just see this old lady 'inviting' 60 Minutes.

Or, after the proper amount of set-up, 60 Minutes paid her, who then claimed that Bob Simon was 'invited'. Rather like the pusher who says he was 'invited' by the addict.
The survivors' friendship began in Theresienstadt, a transit camp. From here, a garrison town before the war, Jews were sent off to the gas chambers of Auschwitz. Nearly 140,000 Jews from all over central Europe passed through the camp, including many of Europe’s most prominent artists who left a record of what it was like. Much of the art has survived, some of it by children. They portrayed how cold and crowded they were, sleeping 30 to a room, how typhus epidemics swept through the camp. The dead were brought to catacombs before being incinerated. Bodies were carried on the same wagons used for bread. Jews weren’t gassed at Theresienstadt but more than 30,000 died of disease and hunger.

Theresienstadt, the camp that was so horrible that the Germans allowed them to paint, draw, play music, have operas.

Typus epidemics indeed.

There is no proof for these alleged gas chambers which, when investigated rationally, are utterly & scientifically impossible.

There is no proof for the grossly exaggerated '30,000'.
Music flourished in the camp—it was like a Julliard for Jews. There were classes and concerts in cellars and attics. The hottest ticket in town was Brundibar, written by a Czech Jew and smuggled into the camp.

Those terrible Nazis, allowing an opera written by a Jew, but supposedly Jews gave secret concerts in attics and basements with musical instruments which must have been invisible, with soundwaves which didn't travel.

Music concerts, classes, true, but openly encouraged and arranged by the Germans. There was no need to hide.

You gotta laugh, 'a Jew smuggled into a concentration camp filled with 'horror'.
"It wasn't easy to get tickets," remembers Dita Krause, who was in the choir in Brundibar. She says tickets were printed for every performance and were maybe the most difficult to get.

No doubt the printing press was 'smuggled' in too, right.
Asked if the Germans didn't realize that or whether they worried about it, Drori tells Simon, "Yeah that what we wondered all the time. If they don't understand that what we are singing is against them. If they don't understand it. Or if they just don't care, because they knew what we didn't know. That we are meant all to go to the gas chambers and to die, not to survive. Maybe they thought, 'Ah let the Jews play a little bit before they go to be, to be killed.'"

But by 1944 reports were circulating in allied capitals that Jews were being deported and exterminated.

'Meant to go to the gas chambers', so why didn't they go?

Deportations were no big deal in WWII, the gassing reports were found to be baseless. Any reading, fact checking, and rational analysis of the these 'reports' reveals them to be preposterous, conflicting, and utterly impossible.

- Hannover
If it can't happen as alleged, then it didn't.

Mannstein
Valued contributor
Valued contributor
Posts: 227
Joined: Tue Nov 07, 2006 7:50 pm

Postby Mannstein » 1 decade 2 years ago (Mon Feb 26, 2007 3:11 pm)

This is a total fabrication. The Red Cross had complete access to all German camps during the war including Auschwitz. This was not the case for the Soviet Gulag.

The holo.industry is working overtime rehashing the same old nonsense hoping to soften up the public in preparation for the attack on Iran.

Breker
Valuable asset
Valuable asset
Posts: 765
Joined: Thu May 18, 2006 5:39 pm
Location: Europa

Postby Breker » 1 decade 2 years ago (Mon Feb 26, 2007 3:23 pm)

Mannstein wrote:The holo.industry is working overtime rehashing the same old nonsense hoping to soften up the public in preparation for the attack on Iran.

It would appear they are also softening up the American public for the enactment of laws which incarcerate those who voice different opinions.
Breker

theTRUTH
Valued contributor
Valued contributor
Posts: 195
Joined: Wed Jan 19, 2005 9:50 pm

Postby theTRUTH » 1 decade 2 years ago (Tue Feb 27, 2007 12:50 am)

Bob Simon, with homes in New York and Tel Aviv, has presented many other Holohoax-related documentaries with sympathetic questions to make viewers believe his interviewees are telling the truth. There is no softness of humanness in his voice; rather he sounds like a loud shrill programmed machine.
"Israel must invent dangers, and to do this it must adopt the methods of provocation..." Moshe Sharett, Israeli's Foreign Minister ('48-'54), & Prime Minister ('54-'56).

User avatar
Hannover
Valuable asset
Valuable asset
Posts: 9911
Joined: Sun Nov 24, 2002 7:53 pm

Postby Hannover » 1 decade 2 years ago (Tue Feb 27, 2007 1:46 am)

All the dumb 'holocaust' stories are like this, they collapse upon themselves.

Hey, don't blame Revisionists, judeo-supremacists are the ones pushing this ridiculous nonsense. Revisionists are just the messengers, the absurd and impossible stories are the message.

- Hannover
If it can't happen as alleged, then it didn't.

Radar
Valued contributor
Valued contributor
Posts: 505
Joined: Sat Feb 26, 2005 2:25 pm

Postby Radar » 1 decade 2 years ago (Tue Feb 27, 2007 5:23 pm)

The story appeared on the "60 Minutes" program last night and was seen by millions. It was propaganda from start to finish. The story told was that the Germans pulled the wool over the eyes of the naive Red Cross by allowing them a one day visit to Theresienstadt which they had spruced up for the visit. It was implied that the camp was ordinarily a hell hole although, oddly, they had a free theater which was even allowed to produce a play they claimed to be mocking Hitler! The Red Cross we are told didn't interview any of the camp inmates and wrote a glowing report which was not read for viewers. One reason undoubtedly being that the report was far from naive.

In its post-war Report on Activities During the War published in 1948 the Red Cross said:
"During the last year of the war, the Committee's delegates were able to visit the camp of Theresienstadt (Terezin), which was exclusivley used for Jews, and was governed by special conditions. From information gathered by the Committee, this camp had been started as an experiment by certain leaders of the Reich, who were apparently less hostile to the Jews than those responsible for the racial policy of the German Government. These men wished to give the Jews the means of setting up a communal life in a town under their own administration and possessing almost complete autonomy..."

The report went on to tell how they had visited the camp and been told by the Jewish leaders of the camp that conditions were bearable but foreign Jewish organizations challenged this report and the Committee investigated again on April 6, 1945, apparently the claimed "spruced up" visit alleged in the 60 Minutes show. They confirmed the favorable impression of the first visit but found that the camp had then been used as a transit camp, a use which the Germans said would not be continued, not strange considering the status of the war at the time.

None of this was reported in the 60 Minutes program. There was considerable lying by former camp residents however.

And millions saw the show and thought they were hearing history!

disillusioned
Member
Member
Posts: 64
Joined: Sat May 15, 2004 7:19 am

Postby disillusioned » 1 decade 2 years ago (Wed Feb 28, 2007 7:25 am)

So many lies. I get so confused.

I thought they covered up the sounds of the gas chambers with motorcycles?

Oh wait. Perhaps this was the start of the german avant-garde musical movement! An opera of motorcycles!


Return to “'Holocaust' Debate / Controversies / Comments / News”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: borjastick, HMSendeavour and 4 guests