Bone crushing machine?

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MrNobody
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Postby MrNobody » 1 decade 1 year ago (Thu Aug 07, 2008 10:06 am)

Carto's Cutlass Supreme wrote:Hi Muller,

Welcome to the forum.

When you say "rotating screen" I'm not sure what you mean. Is it that the cylinder using centrifugal force to separate rock/pebble size?


No, but you can't just dump a heap of gravel on a screen & expect all the smaller graded sizes to fall through, you need motion, a similar principal is used by Archaeologists with a manually operated screen hung from an A-Frame, the screen is pushed back & forth with all the small loose material falling through.
Wir brauchen eine Bewegung, die Deutschland endlich aus der Kontrolle der Kräfte von Versailles und Jalta befreit, die uns schon ein ganzes Jahrhundert lang von einer Kastastrophe in die andere stürzt.

Helga Zepp-LaRouche.

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Postby muller » 1 decade 1 year ago (Mon Aug 11, 2008 2:00 pm)

Carto's Cutlass Supreme wrote:Hi Muller,

Welcome to the forum.

When you say "rotating screen" I'm not sure what you mean. Is it that the cylinder using centrifugal force to separate rock/pebble size?


A rotating screen is a hollow cylinder the wall of which is a sieve. i. e. a steel sheet with perforations of a certain diameter or a wire mesh. The sreen on the photo has probably several concentric cylindrical sieves of different diameters. The gravel falls on the exterior cylinder which has the biggest perforations. Excess size grains do not pass and fall off, the cylinder rotating all the time. The material which has passed the outer sieve then falls onto the second (inner) sieve which has smaller perforations, and then to a third sieve and so on. If the first sieve has holes of 15mm diameter and the second sieve 7mm, the grains between 7 and 15mm size are caught between the two sieves. This material is evacuated by spiraling steel sheet strips which transport it towards the end of the cylinder. -There are other designs possible, e.g. that the material flows from inside out, or the cylinder is slightly inclined so that the material wanders to the lower end, or the different sieves have the same diameter and are placed one after another along the length of the cylinder.
Today you won't see such rotating screens any more; they are replaced by flat vibrating sieves which have a more sophisticated machinery.

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Postby muller » 1 decade 1 year ago (Wed Aug 13, 2008 4:45 am)

I must correct my post of August 11. If the rotating screen has several concentric cylinders with perforations of different size, the material flows from inside out, not vice versa. The gravel is fed into the innermost cylinder via the feeding funnel. This cylinder has the biggest perforations, the following outer cylinders have gradually smaller perforations, the outermost cylinder having the smallest perforations. This last cylinder is visible on the photo; you see there, if your eyes are good enough, a fine wire mesh. My eyes not being so good anymore, I did not notice it at first glance.

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Re: Bone crushing machine?

Postby Toshiro » 7 years 7 months ago (Tue Feb 14, 2012 5:38 am)

Here's another shot of the machine:
Image

Here is a rotating screen/screener/trommel from a 1905 book "Modern buildings, their planning, construction and equipment", page 132:
Plant-Required-For-Building-Work-Of-The-Largest-Si-271.jpg
A Sand and Gravel Washer and Screener, also made by Koppel, is shown in Fig. 239, the feed being continuous. By turning off the water supply it can be used, when required, as a screener only. It is suitable for builders and contractors for screening and washing sand and gravel for mortar and concrete; and can be obtained either "Portable" or "Stationary," and for either steam or hand power. The hand machine works very easily, indeed, one man being readily able to turn the handle against two men shovelling in dirty material.


The "Koppel" referring to Orenstein & Koppel:
Image

Orenstein & Koppel (normally abbreviated to "O&K") was a major German engineering company specialising in railway vehicles, escalators, and heavy equipment. It was founded on April 1, 1876 in Berlin by Benno Orenstein and Arthur Koppel.


Here is a modern trommel:
Image

As for it being a Kugelmühle or ball mill, you can check how ball mills looked like back in the day (and still do) here: http://museumvictoria.com.au/collection ... =ball+mill

They are heavy and massive with a thick metal casing, which you need to crush material. The Janowska machine looks fragile with a thin metal casing and you can even see the wire mesh which is used as a sieve. The top casing even got removed by people because it was that light, whereas a ball mill is in one part and doesn't have a detachable casing, and even if it did, it would weigh over 100 kg, impossible to lift. There is no way that machine could be used for crushing any material, except maybe eggs.

So much for it being a "Knochenmühle."
Last edited by Toshiro on Tue Feb 14, 2012 6:49 am, edited 3 times in total.

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Re: Bone crushing machine?

Postby Kingfisher » 7 years 7 months ago (Tue Feb 14, 2012 6:01 am)

here's what an actual bone crusher looks like:

Image

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Re: Bone crushing machine?

Postby tyger » 7 years 7 months ago (Tue Feb 14, 2012 8:04 am)

I showed the photo of the bone crusher to a friend who works in the aggregate industry. He is certain that it is of a trommel. A ball mill would be much wider in relation to its diameter.

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Re: Bone crushing machine?

Postby Zulu » 7 years 7 months ago (Wed Feb 15, 2012 1:33 pm)

Kingfisher wrote:here's what an actual bone crusher looks like:

Image

Ther are other models of crusher.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crusher
The ball mill doesn't have the same function as it is used to reduce the size of the particles of a media until powder generally.

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Re: Bone crushing machine?

Postby six gun » 7 years 6 months ago (Mon Feb 20, 2012 4:32 pm)

Image

This subject was discussed on another forum in relation to Treblinka.

I was told by another poster than the "bone crusher" at Janowska was moved to the extermination camps to crush the bones.
He said this machine is a ball mill.
A ball mill could be used to crushing bones or anything hard.

The photographs of this machine get banded about a lot.

A poster stated it was a trommel - a screening machine as mentioned here.
I dug out a photograph of a modern trommel which another poster here has posted.

It you look closely at the screen it has the ripple iridescent you see on the surface of a curved slightly rippled mesh.

It is clearer here on an enlarged view I made.

Image

Look more closely and there appears to be another cylinder inside the outer cylinder which you can see through the mesh, further evidence it is a mesh.
I have outlined the inner cylinder.

Image

A modern trommel looks like this.

Image

It would be really cool if we could get the make and model of this thing along with the catalogue from the manufacturer.
That would crush the idea this is a bone crusher (or not depending on what it turned up)

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Re: Bone crushing machine?

Postby six gun » 7 years 6 months ago (Wed Feb 22, 2012 3:49 pm)

A post from a holocaust believer stated the machine in the photo was a small portable ball mill manufactured by NETZSCH Maschinenfabrik.

Image

On holocaustcontroversies.blogspot it says:

The caption translates: "Heinrich Chamaides, David Manuschewitz and Moische Korn (f.l.t.r.) on the platform of the bone mill in the Janowska camp in Lemberg. They belong to one of the many »unearthing detachments« which in 1943/44 have to remove the mass graves".

Do we have photographs showing any of these people to check out where it is actually them in the first place?


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