Rare Holocaust-Era Teen Diary Revealed

Read and post various viewpoints or search our large archives.

Moderator: Moderator

Forum rules
Be sure to read the Rules/guidelines before you post!
User avatar
phdnm
Valuable asset
Valuable asset
Posts: 3734
Joined: Tue Jun 05, 2012 12:11 pm

Rare Holocaust-Era Teen Diary Revealed

Postby phdnm » 6 years 10 months ago (Wed Mar 05, 2014 11:50 pm)

Great :? They found a new tool for the brainwashing of the kids ...


Rare Holocaust-Era Teen Diary Revealed for First Time Will Further Holocaust Education around the Globe

SAN FRANCISCO, March 4, 2014 - The JFCS Holocaust Center in partnership with Lehrhaus Judaica today announced the publication of The Diary of Rywka Lipszyc. After more than 70 years in obscurity, the diary of a teenage girl that was found at Auschwitz in 1945 will be revealed for the first time to the public on March 10, 2014.

Accompanied by rich background materials and edited by National Jewish Book Award recipient Alexandra Zapruder, the book is destined to become an important source of inspiration for students of the Holocaust around the world.

In 1940, the Nazis forced young Rywka Lipszyc (pronounced Rif-ka Lip-shitz) and her family into what would become Poland's notorious Lodz Ghetto. After witnessing the death of her parents and deportation of her younger siblings, Rywka, at the age of 14, began to record her thoughts and dreams in a precious diary.

Discovery of this rare manuscript prompted exhaustive research into what actually happened to Rywka. While it is known that Rywka survived the war, collaborative efforts of archivists and historians around the world have not uncovered the mystery of her ultimate fate. Rywka's surviving cousins with whom she lived in the Lodz Ghetto currently reside in Israel, and a representative from her family will be present at the book launch.

The book launch event for The Diary of Rywka Lipszyc will take place on Monday, March 10, 4:30 – 6:00 pm, at Jewish Family and Children's Services, 2150 Post St., San Francisco.

"At age 14, Rywka wrote with great feeling and searing insight about her life in the Lodz Ghetto," said Dr. Anita Friedman, Executive Director of Jewish Family and Children's Services. "Rywka and her teenaged cousins lived in deplorable conditions before being deported to Auschwitz. They endured forced labor, a death march, and extreme suffering. She was a young survivor, and her diary serves as an important educational resource that high school students relate to and that Holocaust educators across the globe are using to inspire moral courage and activism in future generations."

In conjunction with the book, web-based learning tools are also being developed to assist educators and students throughout the world in learning more about the Holocaust. On March 10, 2014, an unedited version of The Diary of Rywka Lipszyc will be available online for scholars, educators, and students, as well as the Polish transcription and the scanned copy of the original manuscript.

"Lehrhaus is honored to be the partner of the JFCS Holocaust Center in translating, editing, and publishing the Diary of Rywka Lipszyc," said Fred Rosenbaum, Founding Director of Lehrhaus Judaica and the author of a chapter in the book. "The diary is an invaluable historical document because it was written in the Lodz Ghetto—the largest and most oppressive in all of Europe—between October 1943 and April 1944—during a period not covered by any other young diarist and a time of severe disease and hunger in the ghetto. She was also one of the relatively few religious teenage Holocaust diarists, and her entire journal is infused with an abiding faith in God. Judaism was her comfort and her shield as she came of age amidst unspeakable suffering and cruelty."


http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases ... 21121.html


From Yad Vashem:


The Shoah Victims' Names Recovery Project

Connections and Discoveries

Rywka's Diary

The Voice of a Young Girl in the Ghetto


"I am just a tiny spot, even under a microscope I would be very hard to see – but I can laugh at the whole world because I am a Jew. I am poor and in the ghetto, I do not know what will happen to me tomorrow, and yet I can laugh at the whole world because I have something very strong supporting me – my faith."

So wrote 14-year-old Rywka Lipszyc in a diary she kept in the Lodz ghetto from October 1943 until April 1944. Rywka was born in September 1929 in Lodz, Poland, the daughter of Miriam and Jankiel Lipszyc – descendants of a great Polish Rabbinic line. After losing her parents and siblings to disease and deportation, Rywka spent the remainder of the war with her cousins, Mina and Esther Lipszyc. After surviving the hunger of the Lodz ghetto, the horrors of Auschwitz and a grueling death march, the three cousins arrived at Bergen Belsen, weak and very sick. Esther last saw Rywka on her deathbed in the hospital ward. She and Mina slowly recuperated in Sweden, but they never again heard any more news of their cousin until last summer, when they were told about the diary, thanks to a Page of Testimony Mina submitted to Yad Vashem in Rywka's memory.

Rywka's diary was found in the ashes of the crematoria at Aushwitz-Birkenau in early 1945 by Zinaida Berezovskaya, a doctor who arrived at the camp with the liberating Red Army. The diary (in Polish, Yiddish and Hebrew) documented Rywka's daily life, along with her hopes, dreams and deepest emotions. Berezovskaya stored it in an envelope, along with a newspaper clipping about the liberation of Auschwitz. For over half a century it remained untouched, until Berezovskaya's granddaughter discovered it among her father's effects in June 2008 and brought it to the Jewish Family and Children's Services (JFCS) Holocaust Center in San Francisco.

Archivists at the center immediately began to investigate the identity of the diary's author, which ultimately led them to discover the Page of Testimony commemorating Rywka submitted by Mina Boyer in 1955 (updated in 2000). With the assistance of Yad Vashem staff, the family was contacted through Hadassah Halamish, Esther's daughter, who was deeply moved to learn of the diary's discovery so many years later.

For Esther and Mina, reading the diary has re-awakened painful memories of their wartime experiences, but it has also provided them with the strength to share the rich legacy of their family's faith, expressed so poignantly in Rywka's diary.

"I tried to cut myself off from it, but then suddenly it came back," said Mina. "I had a few sleepless nights, because I was re-living everything. But I will not give [the Nazis] the satisfaction that I cannot sleep. That I will never do."

Esther was the oldest of the cousins, who took on the responsibility for raising Rywka after her parents' death. She recalled how central the diary was in Rywka's young life. "It took me right back. There's even a section in the diary where she writes that I told her she shouldn't be writing. I was always telling her not to write because there were other, more important things to be doing, like running the house. I needed help."

In April 2012, San Francisco JFCS Executive Director Dr. Anita Freidman, a longtime supporter of the international Shoah Victims' Names Recovery Project, travelled to Israel to meet Esther and Mina and to allow the family to read Rywka's words from the original diary, which is planned to be published in the near future.

"I am terribly sad that I never had the opportunity to meet her," said Hadassah Halamish. "I know we would have had a lot in common. I have learned so much from her. Even under the most impossible living conditions, Rywka never lost the divine spirit inside her. Now she has returned to us again. Esther and my mother have had the honor of raising large families in Israel, thereby keeping alive the memory of the dead. Anyone who reads Rywka's diary will be a part of honoring her memory."


http://www.yadvashem.org/yv/en/remembra ... pshitz.asp

Engel
Member
Member
Posts: 28
Joined: Wed Feb 22, 2012 4:35 am
Location: Canada

Re: Rare Holocaust-Era Teen Diary Revealed

Postby Engel » 6 years 10 months ago (Thu Mar 06, 2014 12:09 am)

Do we have any word on the authenticity of the Diary, or if it even mentions anything about the alleged gas chambers?

If Anne Frank and Elie Wiesel are anything to go by, they show that wartime documents and experiences don't necessarily corroborate the narrative.
"The Soviets are undoubtedly going to make it their business to discover as many mass graves as possible and then blame it on us." - Joseph Goebbels

EtienneSC
Valued contributor
Valued contributor
Posts: 592
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2011 2:27 pm

Re: Rare Holocaust-Era Teen Diary Revealed

Postby EtienneSC » 6 years 10 months ago (Thu Mar 06, 2014 8:11 am)

Rywka's diary was found in the ashes of the crematoria at Aushwitz-Birkenau in early 1945 by Zinaida Berezovskaya, a doctor who arrived at the camp with the liberating Red Army.
I find this unlikely.

User avatar
Hannover
Valuable asset
Valuable asset
Posts: 10255
Joined: Sun Nov 24, 2002 7:53 pm

Re: Rare Holocaust-Era Teen Diary Revealed

Postby Hannover » 6 years 10 months ago (Thu Mar 06, 2014 11:01 am)

EtienneSC wrote:
Rywka's diary was found in the ashes of the crematoria at Aushwitz-Birkenau in early 1945 by Zinaida Berezovskaya, a doctor who arrived at the camp with the liberating Red Army.
I find this unlikely.
I find it laughable.
Accompanied by rich background materials and edited by National Jewish Book Award recipient Alexandra Zapruder, the book is destined to become an important source of inspiration for students of the Holocaust around the world.
- Edited? But why?
- "Accompanied by rich background materials... ". IOW, easily refuted propaganda added to an edited diary. Well, this is the so called 'holocaust' where anything goes. The desperation by Jewish supremacists is glaring.

The tide is turning.

- Hannover
If it can't happen as alleged, then it didn't.

User avatar
Kingfisher
Valuable asset
Valuable asset
Posts: 1673
Joined: Sat Jan 30, 2010 4:55 pm

Re: Rare Holocaust-Era Teen Diary Revealed

Postby Kingfisher » 6 years 10 months ago (Thu Mar 06, 2014 1:34 pm)

EtienneSC wrote:
Rywka's diary was found in the ashes of the crematoria at Aushwitz-Birkenau in early 1945 by Zinaida Berezovskaya, a doctor who arrived at the camp with the liberating Red Army.
I find this unlikely.

Why? If they could find a passport in the ruins of the World Trade Center.

Breker
Valuable asset
Valuable asset
Posts: 864
Joined: Thu May 18, 2006 5:39 pm
Location: Europa

Re: Rare Holocaust-Era Teen Diary Revealed

Postby Breker » 6 years 10 months ago (Thu Mar 06, 2014 2:02 pm)

Why? If they could find a passport in the ruins of the World Trade Center.
That is precisely what I thought when I read it. But as my mother always said: 'Two wrongs do not make a right'.
B.
Revisionists are just the messengers, the impossibility of the "Holocaust" narrative is the message.


Return to “'Holocaust' Debate / Controversies / Comments / News”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests