Robert Cohen's 'Auschwitz revisited' in denial of research

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Hannover
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Robert Cohen's 'Auschwitz revisited' in denial of research

Postby Hannover » 4 years 11 months ago (Thu Apr 16, 2015 1:31 pm)

Here is duplicitous article where the author tries to appear circumspect and understanding, a gentler, kinder version of Jewish supremacist propaganda. It's as if the author, Robert Cohen, wishes to hide the fact that the claims about Auschwitz are religious & fantasy based, that the claims about Auschwitz do not hold up to to scientific, rational scrutiny. I mean it's not even close, the narrative has been simply routed by research and analysis. The claims are simply impossible.

In spite of Cohen's appearance of sensitivity, he is in fact supporting a demonstratively false narrative which is racist, anti-gentile, anti-German, anti-European while being very profitable to Jews everywhere.

Regardless of the countless arguments at this forum by those attempting to defend the Auschwitz storyline, all have failed utterly.
I invite our reader to peruse the pages here and see for themselves. I challenge anyone who disagrees to register and debate their position for all to see.

excerpts:
Holocaust denial will remain a fringe issue. The documentation is secure in its veracity and overwhelming in its volume. If anything, today’s school children are in danger of thinking that Churchill, Roosevelt and Stalin went to war against Hitler because of what was happening to the Jews.
Since the end of the Second World War we have had Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Darfur. All of which suggest that despite the creation of so much international law on human rights and genocide, humankind has not progressed an iota as a result of Auschwitz.
On the return journey my father asked their driver if he had known about the camp during the war. “Oh, yes”, he replied. “We knew something was happening. We could smell it.” My father asked him whether anyone at the time felt they could do anything about it? The driver replied “Yes, we would wind up the windows tight, so we couldn’t smell the stink”.

Oh really? This forum & CODOH in general are seeing it's hits rise. Revisionist comments throughout discussion sites are commonplace ... when not censored. Laws against so called 'holocaust denial' are proof of the growing awareness of the absurd and racist nature of the claims. Awareness and resistance is growing.

The so called "documentation" is no documentation at all. Simply stated, there is none and easily demonstrated as such.
Germany went to war because it was forced to, as even mainstream researchers are realizing; see our WWII forum.
And no, Robert Cohen, you can't latch onto other 'genocides' in an effort to buy votes for your impossible as alleged storyline. This reminds me of the 'holocaust' Industry's use of the gypsies, homosexuals, & handicapped canard to gain support from the gullible PC crowd.
True enough, synthetic rubber manufacturing emits an unpleasant smell.
And note the staged photo, as debunked at this forum.

Read on, comments invited.

- Hannover

source: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/01/auschwitz-revisited
Auschwitz revisited
Robert Cohen on January 30, 2015

Image

In the week we have been commemorating the 70th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz I have been trying to understand why I am so weary and wary of the Holocaust. Despite the undoubted emotional pull of the survivors’ testimonies, is there any lasting meaning be found in the ashes at Auschwitz? Should it even be looked for?

I didn’t always feel this way.

We recently moved house and a few weeks ago my older son and I were unpacking boxes of books and finding new homes for them. I noticed just how much reading I had done on the subject of the Holocaust, mostly more than twenty years ago.

I had straight histories like ‘The War Against the Jews’ by Lucy Dawidowicz and ‘Holocaust’ by Martin Gilbert. I’d read ‘Last Waltz in Vienna’ by George Clare, Elie Wiesel’s ‘Night’, ‘Europa, Europa’ by Solomon Perel and Primo Levi’s ‘If This is a Man’, and ‘The Drowned and the Saved’. There were Art Spiegelman’s graphic novels ‘Maus’, where Nazis and Jews become cats and mice. Ghetto accounts such as ‘A Cup of Tears’ by Abraham Lewin and Marek Edelman’s ‘The Ghetto Fights’. I remembered being completely absorbed by Theo Richmond’s detailed account of the destruction of one tiny shtetl village ‘Konin’. I had the complete transcript of Claude Lanzmann’s epic documentary Shoah. Hannah Arendt’s account of the Eichmann trial in Jerusalem in the 1950s. And of course, Anne Frank’s diary, the fully annotated critical edition.

My reading had been a search for meaning – historical, political and theological. I had been trying to make sense of something I knew was shaping my adult Jewish identity.

Last weekend I visited my 88-year-old father and asked him to recall for me the visit he made to Auschwitz in the late 1960s while on a business trip to Poland. Perhaps his account could restore my faith in the possibility of finding a purpose in the week’s commemorations beyond honouring the memory of the dead.

My father’s visit to the death camp took place in a very different world from today. For the first two decades after the war the mood had been for moving on, for forgetting not remembering. The Holocaust was very far from being the defining event of the Second World War it has now become.

While he was on his trip, my father and three work colleagues found themselves with time on their hands when a public holiday was announced to coincide with a Soviet Russian State visit. Their local client, the factory manager of a smelt works in Katowice, suggested they visited Auschwitz, which he explained now ran as a museum.

Although my father was familiar with the name Auschwitz, he told me his knowledge of the how the Nazis had implemented their killing was vague and sketchy at the time of his visit to Poland. Two of his colleagues had served in the army during the war but their understanding was even less than my father’s. So the four British businessmen hired a driver and set off for the day with little or no expectation of what they were about to see.

They reached Auschwitz less than an hour after leaving Katowice and found the camp/museum almost deserted despite the public holiday. In fact, my father and his colleagues seemed to be the only visitors there and were rewarded with a personal tour by one of the senior officials.

They were taken to long wooden huts sectioned off into large glass-fronted display cases. Inside the first display were bails of material that my father could not identify. “What is this?” He asked. “Human hair” came the reply, “shaved from the heads of those about to be exterminated.” Nothing went to waste, it was explained, “The hair could be weaved into cloth and used for insulation”. Next came a display of walking sticks and crutches neatly stacked in huge piles. Then shoes, all sizes, suitcases still with name and home address labels attached, spectacles and false teeth. Apparently, it all had revenue potential for the Third Reich.

After three hours of the tour my father was becoming increasingly uncomfortable with the attitude of their guide. “He was more interested in the Nazis’ attention to detail, administrative diligence and mechanical ingenuity than in the morality of what had taken place there.” Finally, they were taken to see the furnaces that burned day and night, fueled by human corpses.

But what had been new and revelatory to my father nearly fifty years ago has become burdensome and problematic to me. When I look at all the books on my shelves relating to just 12 years out of three thousand years of Jewish history, I have no desire to revisit them or even flick through the pages.

As a student I had thought there were lessons to be learnt and meaning to be divined from what had happened. But now it feels as if the event has been used, abused and politicised, and, from a moral perspective, largely ignored.

As time has passed I have become increasingly pessimistic about our ability to take something meaningful and positive from the horror that is now summed up by the single word ‘Auschwitz’.

Some, especially the remaining survivors, see denial and forgetfulness of the Holocaust as the biggest concern we should have. But I think these are the least of our Holocaust problems.

Holocaust denial will remain a fringe issue. The documentation is secure in its veracity and overwhelming in its volume. If anything, today’s school children are in danger of thinking that Churchill, Roosevelt and Stalin went to war against Hitler because of what was happening to the Jews.

And we have become very good at remembering. We do it with great care and respect and afford enormous dignity to the survivors and their testimonies. This week’s marking of the Russian army’s liberation of Auschwitz proved this once again. So, we remember with no difficulty. It’s acting on the remembrance that defeats us.

Since the end of the Second World War we have had Cambodia, Rwanda, Bosnia and Darfur. All of which suggest that despite the creation of so much international law on human rights and genocide, humankind has not progressed an iota as a result of Auschwitz.

I can now see that my own long-term reaction to the Holocaust has led me not to focus on anti-Semitism and Jewish security (although neither can be ignored) but on the values and teaching that I see as central to Judaism. Justice, Compassion, Humility, individual and collective Responsibility. These are not new lessons but very old ones. As a Jew, I choose to apply these to our relationship with the Palestinian people because this is the issue on which we must judge ourselves. In the 21st century this is ‘the Jewish question’.

While a growing number of Jews both in Israel and around the world share this perspective, it is still a minority opinion.

When it comes to the Palestinian people, the Holocaust has hardened our hearts and closed our minds. The scale of our own suffering has made us blind to their suffering – which we see as all of their own making.

Perhaps this was inevitable. Why should a people abused and broken become saints? The opposite result is more often the outcome. I am asking for too much. Expecting something that no group is capable of.

And so I have become both weary and wary of trying to take meaning or lessons from the Holocaust. Yes, we must continue to teach it as an appalling stain on humanity. And an exercise in empathy is never wasted. But we must not expect it to unlock the human heart.

Maybe all we have are the stories of bureaucratised murder, random survival, and unexpected acts of kindness that Primo Levi called ‘Moments of Reprieve’.

My father and his colleagues had planned to eat a meal together that night back at the hotel in Katowice. But after the visit nobody was hungry.

On the return journey my father asked their driver if he had known about the camp during the war. “Oh, yes”, he replied. “We knew something was happening. We could smell it.” My father asked him whether anyone at the time felt they could do anything about it? The driver replied “Yes, we would wind up the windows tight, so we couldn’t smell the stink”.

This piece first appeared on Cohen’s site, Micah’s Paradigm Shift. See also Cohen’s post, A Letter to Anne Frank.
About Robert Cohen

Cohen is a British writer. He blogs at Micah's Paradigm Shift. http://micahsparadigmshift.blogspot.co.uk/
If it can't happen as alleged, then it didn't.

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Re: Robert Cohen's 'Auschwitz revisited' in denial of resear

Postby Mulegino1 » 4 years 11 months ago (Thu Apr 16, 2015 2:18 pm)

"Finally, they were taken to see the furnaces that burned day and night, fueled by human corpses."

Here we go again. Bodies burn on their own! Let me qualify that: "In Holocaust land, bodies burn on their own, and can even be used to fire 'furnaces'."

They should replace the "Arbeit Macht Frei" sign at the main gate with the German equivalent of "Leave your brains here." :lol:

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Re: Robert Cohen's 'Auschwitz revisited' in denial of resear

Postby Dresden » 4 years 11 months ago (Thu Apr 16, 2015 3:45 pm)

Mulegino1 said:

"Here we go again. Bodies burn on their own! Let me qualify that: "In Holocaust land, bodies burn on their own, and can even be used to fire 'furnaces'." "


According to the official story, "the bodies of women burn better than men"

According to science, women's bodies contain a higher % of water than men.

So, when burning bodies, always remember.....for maximum effect.....just add water.
Maybe, just maybe, they believe what they are telling you about the 'holocaust', but maybe, just maybe, their contempt for your intelligence and your character is beyond anything you could ever have imagined. -- Bradley Smith

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Re: Robert Cohen's 'Auschwitz revisited' in denial of resear

Postby Atigun » 4 years 11 months ago (Thu Apr 16, 2015 4:27 pm)

I'm sure that future historians will look back on the claims of the holocaust, the resulting trials, executions and punishments with the same mixture of horror and incredulity that current historians view the medieval witch trials and their executions and punishments.

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Re: Robert Cohen's 'Auschwitz revisited' in denial of resear

Postby Inquisitor » 4 years 11 months ago (Thu Apr 16, 2015 8:26 pm)

Holocaust denial will remain a fringe issue. The documentation is secure in its veracity and overwhelming in its volume.


Well that second sentence is half right. The volume of "documentation," that is to say propaganda, fantasy stories, falsifications and fakes, and so forth, are indeed tremendous! But "secure in its veracity?" Hardly! No matter how many times that claim is repeated, it never makes it any more truthful. Anyone who actually takes an objective, intellectually-honest look into this "documentation" will discover that there is nothing at all "secure" about "holocaust" claims at all. Indeed, just the opposite is true.

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Re: Robert Cohen's 'Auschwitz revisited' in denial of resear

Postby Hektor » 4 years 11 months ago (Thu Apr 16, 2015 8:58 pm)

Inquisitor wrote:Well that second sentence is half right. The volume of "documentation," that is to say propaganda, fantasy stories, falsifications and fakes, and so forth, are indeed tremendous! But "secure in its veracity?" Hardly! No matter how many times that claim is repeated, it never makes it any more truthful. Anyone who actually takes an objective, intellectually-honest look into this "documentation" will discover that there is nothing at all "secure" about "holocaust" claims at all. Indeed, just the opposite is true.

Well, there is tremendous documentation in connection with concentration camps and measures concerning Jews. Just that they DO NOT prove any extermination program and are often difficult to reconcile with one.

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Re: Robert Cohen's 'Auschwitz revisited' in denial of resear

Postby Inquisitor » 4 years 11 months ago (Fri Apr 17, 2015 3:06 pm)

Hektor wrote:
Inquisitor wrote:Well that second sentence is half right. The volume of "documentation," that is to say propaganda, fantasy stories, falsifications and fakes, and so forth, are indeed tremendous! But "secure in its veracity?" Hardly! No matter how many times that claim is repeated, it never makes it any more truthful. Anyone who actually takes an objective, intellectually-honest look into this "documentation" will discover that there is nothing at all "secure" about "holocaust" claims at all. Indeed, just the opposite is true.

Well, there is tremendous documentation in connection with concentration camps and measures concerning Jews. Just that they DO NOT prove any extermination program and are often difficult to reconcile with one.


Good point - indeed, that legitimate documentation effectively proves just the opposite, if one looks at it objectively.

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Re: Robert Cohen's 'Auschwitz revisited' in denial of resear

Postby borjastick » 4 years 11 months ago (Mon Apr 20, 2015 5:28 am)

I was brought up on the borders of south east London and Kent. Near to our house, perhaps three miles away, was a crematorium. In those days (60s-70s) burning bodies wasn't so ecological. The smoke, fumes and such like went straight up the chimney. One could smell it very clearly. There was a sickly sweet stench.

When he says that they knew what was going on because they could smell burning bodies it is a reference purely and simply to the crematory ovens doing their job of disposing of those who died mainly from typhus etc. In no way does it prove mass murder.

This is laughable.
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