76 years after the infamous D-Day, do the western allies WW2 veterans still think they fought on the right side?

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Mortimer
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Re: 76 years after the infamous D-Day, do the western allies WW2 veterans still think they fought on the right side?

Postby Mortimer » 1 month 2 weeks ago (Sun Jun 14, 2020 10:50 pm)

Pia Kahn:
The landing in Normandy was designed to prevent the USSR from taking over Europe. Thus, the landing in Normandy is really the beginning of the "cold war", the rivalry between the USSR and the USA over dominance in Europa.

I think that it is an exaggeration to say that D-Day was the beginning of the Cold War. Roosevelt certainly didn't think so. Even after this event in 1945 Patton was in a position to capture not only Berlin but also Prague. He was ordered not to do so from Eisenhower acting under instructions from Roosevelt in the White House.
https://wearswar.wordpress.com/2017/12/ ... holocaust/
There are 2 sides to every story - always listen or read both points of view and make up your own mind. Don't let others do your thinking for you.

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Hektor
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Re: 76 years after the infamous D-Day, do the western allies WW2 veterans still think they fought on the right side?

Postby Hektor » 1 month 1 week ago (Thu Jun 25, 2020 10:25 pm)

Mortimer wrote:Pia Kahn:
The landing in Normandy was designed to prevent the USSR from taking over Europe. Thus, the landing in Normandy is really the beginning of the "cold war", the rivalry between the USSR and the USA over dominance in Europa.

I think that it is an exaggeration to say that D-Day was the beginning of the Cold War. Roosevelt certainly didn't think so. Even after this event in 1945 Patton was in a position to capture not only Berlin but also Prague. He was ordered not to do so from Eisenhower acting under instructions from Roosevelt in the White House.
https://wearswar.wordpress.com/2017/12/ ... holocaust/


It was kind of a prelude. The Western Allies weren't that much at ease with the Eastern Allies over some fundamental ideological issues. All that kept them together were their desire to smash the Axis, especially Germany.
The Western motive were related to economic competition and a fear that the German model would find working and middle-class support in their own countries. That was especially a threat towards big banking and international trade interests. Given the NS-stance on banking and trade/autarky.
The Soviet motive was, except their drive to world conquest via Western Europe, to smash the major militant force against Communism, which was NS and fascism at the time.
Well, they both succeeded at the price of having the East-West conflict afterwards, which we now call the cold war (Which was pretty warm in some instances, though).

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Re: 76 years after the infamous D-Day, do the western allies WW2 veterans still think they fought on the right side?

Postby Hektor » 1 month 1 week ago (Sat Jun 27, 2020 11:57 am)

borjastick wrote:
Unfortunately most of the British public are ignorant thugs who get their WWII history from atrocious and cheaply made one-sided documentaries. I don't expect the overwhelming evidence assembled by persevering revisionists to make much of an impression in this delusional and truth-fearing country.


Meanwhile in the real world I'll take that as an offensive comment. I am British and despite being a revisionist concerning the holocaust I fully understand that Hitler was the aggressor evidenced by the simple fact that he invaded, Poland, France, Belgium, Holland etc etc blah blah blah. There was only one country that took up arms against Hitler and fought the fight against him and his aggression from start to finish, and that was Great Britain. The war was correct though regrettable and we were right to take a stand.
.....

It's a bit more complicated than that. Germany had unresolved issues with Poland (Borders, ethnic Germans, Danzig) and the German side did actually try to resolve them peacefully with Poland for 20 years. There was some relaxations between the two countries after Hitler became Reichskanzler, but this ended with the untimely death of Josef Pilsudski. Something that Hitler regretted very much, which he also mentions in speeches afterwards (So much for the lie that Hitler considered Slavs {including Poles, Croats, Slovaks, etc.} subhumans).

When Britain started giving Poland a guarantee, the Poles became more aggressive towards Germany (and presumably ethnic Germans as well), of course that also increased the tension. Germany even asked Britain to mediate between the two countries. To no real way, and tension became even worse then, after the Poles discussed war plans with the Brits against Germany.

What I can see there is that there was an anti- a neutral-on and a pro-war faction in Britain. That's something the pro-war faction had to consider that most Brits didn't actually want war and that there were a considerable number of politicians that reflected that sentiment. So my guess is that they on the one hand used the press ranting against Germany (Which was actually trying to resolve the post-Versailles issue) on the other hand the war faction had to be careful to overdo displaying aggression against Germany. So what could they do? Wait for the right moment to give a guarantee to a country that got a beef with Germany, is already aggressive towards Germany and even has shown signs of aggression in the recent past. Poland was the ideal candidate for this. It got considerable size, a large (and also experienced) army. It did invade virtually all the surrounding countries in the past 20 years and it's government was as high-minded as it was un-experienced in the diplomatic. If a war between Germany and the guaranteed-country arose, one could, almost would have to, declare war on Germany and still could play the Knight on the White Horse coming to save the damsel in distress, meaning one wouldn't lose any parliamentary debate in the eyes of the public, if it even came that far.

Perhaps you should have a look into the relevant documents in this regard. I think you'd see what I mean.


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