Allies disposal of human remains at camps?

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oberststuhlherr
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Allies disposal of human remains at camps?

Postby oberststuhlherr » 1 decade 4 years ago (Tue Mar 29, 2005 10:38 pm)

As I understand it, after the war, the Allied forces took control of several KZs populated with tens of thousands of terminally ill prisoners, as well as containing tens of thousands of cadavers. First of all, is this a correct understanding? Secondly, how did the Allies dispose of the dead bodies?

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Postby DowntownSteve » 1 decade 4 years ago (Tue Mar 29, 2005 11:51 pm)

Yes. The Allies took control of several camps where there were people sick and dying because of lack of food and medicine from supply lines having been bombed by themselves.

I assume they cremated the bodies. There were crematories in most camps as I understand it and as I said in another post, it would be the only sanitary way to dispose of tyhpus or dysyntery inflicted bodies.

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Postby TMoran » 1 decade 4 years ago (Wed Mar 30, 2005 12:03 am)

Oberststuhlherr recaps, comments and/or asks

As I understand it, after the war, the Allied forces took control of several KZs populated with tens of thousands of terminally ill prisoners, as well as containing tens of thousands of cadavers. First of all, is this a correct understanding? Secondly, how did the Allies dispose of the dead bodies?


You never saw all those photos of emaciated bodies being buried in mass graves? Those would be at the camps liberated by the Western Allies. Those victims that died from typhus and unintentional starvation, many after the Allies took over. Those camps entered into Nuremberg proceedings as having been centers for mass extermination. At those camps which have since then been declared as having never been mass extermination camps which the Holocaust community has had to acquiesce to. Which, nevertheless, many still insinuate to the naive that the photos represent the result of mass extermination.

The infamous photos. You never saw them?

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Postby oberststuhlherr » 1 decade 4 years ago (Wed Mar 30, 2005 12:24 am)

TMoran wrote:Oberststuhlherr recaps, comments and/or asks

As I understand it, after the war, the Allied forces took control of several KZs populated with tens of thousands of terminally ill prisoners, as well as containing tens of thousands of cadavers. First of all, is this a correct understanding? Secondly, how did the Allies dispose of the dead bodies?


You never saw all those photos of emaciated bodies being buried in mass graves? Those would be at the camps liberated by the Western Allies. Those victims that died from typhus and unintentional starvation, many after the Allies took over. Those camps entered into Nuremberg proceedings as having been centers for mass extermination. At those camps which have since then been declared as having never been mass extermination camps which the Holocaust community has had to acquiesce to. Which, nevertheless, many still insinuate to the naive that the photos represent the result of mass extermination.

The infamous photos. You never saw them?


Certainly I saw the photos. My mother has a four volume set of images from WWII. There are many such pictures in it. What they actually mean is a different story. I haven't seen the books in over a decade, but the are burned into my memory due to the fact that I saw them at a very impressionable age.

I was really wondering if the Allies kept the crematoria in operation after the war.

Interestingly, the Simon Wiesenthal center claims the killing of Jews continued after the war. I wonder what percentage of "Holocaust" victims that would account for. :dontknow:

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Postby Hannover » 1 decade 4 years ago (Wed Mar 30, 2005 3:02 am)

I assume the Allies took risks in burying disease victims, perhaps they felt the emergency warranted that risk. A risk the Germans obviously felt was too high.
The Germans certainly had no fuel for cremations, and I assume the Allies didn't either at that immediate time.
Ofcourse, there were the Allied air attacks on all civilian transports of goods, including fuel, medicines, and foods which created the very conditions that were blamed on the Germans.
"Germany could not so easily be divided into innocent civilians and guilty soldiers. After all, the farmer on his potato patch was feeding German soldiers."

- Chuck Yeager, Yeager: An Autobiography, Bantam Books, New York, 1985, p. 79.


- Hannover
If it can't happen as alleged, then it didn't.

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Postby TMoran » 1 decade 4 years ago (Wed Mar 30, 2005 10:25 am)

As for my wondering if oberststuhlherr ever saw the photos of the bodies at camps liberated by the Allies:

Certainly I saw the photos. My mother has a four volume set of images from WWII. There are many such pictures in it. What they actually mean is a different story. I haven't seen the books in over a decade, but the are burned into my memory due to the fact that I saw them at a very impressionable age.


Do you think you could recall the name of the volume set? It could be of value to revisionists, not that revisionists need any more than they already have. I had a pictorial book on WWII when I was a kid, ala early 50s, which I would look at and read at times. It had about 7 or 8 pages on the alleged mass exterminations and most of it was focused on it all happening at the camps in Germany, Dachau, Mathausen and Bergen Belsen for some. All sorts of stuff. The Jews were given blocks of stone that were supposed to be simulated soap as they went into the showers, cremated in little ovens, hung on hooks, made into soap - etc.

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Postby Secret Anne X » 1 decade 4 years ago (Wed Mar 30, 2005 2:55 pm)

Hi,

Many thousands of inmates died after the US and UK liberated their camps, because there were epidemics. The dead were buried in mass graves or cremated in those cases where the cremation ovens still functioned. Some of those Belsen pictures are of people who died after the liberation. In fact, for Belsen many thousands died afterwards.

I'm surprised that no one mentioned that in fact the bodies of Ribbentrop et al who were hanged in October 1946 were transported to Dachau where they were cremated before their ashes were dumped in a river somewhere. I wonder what that was all about ....

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Postby DowntownSteve » 1 decade 4 years ago (Wed Mar 30, 2005 3:49 pm)

The Israelis did the same thing to Eichmann. Some nonsense about not wanting a grave to become a shrine.

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Postby oberststuhlherr » 1 decade 4 years ago (Wed Mar 30, 2005 8:21 pm)

TMoran wrote:As for my wondering if oberststuhlherr ever saw the photos of the bodies at camps liberated by the Allies:

Certainly I saw the photos. My mother has a four volume set of images from WWII. There are many such pictures in it. What they actually mean is a different story. I haven't seen the books in over a decade, but the are burned into my memory due to the fact that I saw them at a very impressionable age.


Do you think you could recall the name of the volume set?


I'll see if I can verify this, but it may be something along the lines of Life at War, as in Life Magazine.


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