Anybody know what tin sheets were used for?

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Carto's Cutlass Supreme
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Anybody know what tin sheets were used for?

Postby Carto's Cutlass Supreme » 1 decade 3 years ago (Mon Feb 06, 2006 4:04 pm)

Belzec's one alleged survivor Rudolf Reder mentions going on an errand for tin sheets when he escaped. This occured before the cremations began.

Tin sheets are described by Arad as being used (how ridiculous) as a surface to break up the bodies once cremated.

My hunch is that tin sheets were used somehow in the disinfection of clothes or people. Tin sheets would conduct heat well, so maybe in heat disinfection. But how? Does anyone know?

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Postby Hannover » 1 decade 3 years ago (Mon Feb 06, 2006 6:46 pm)

Who knows? Who cares? Tin sheets were used for what tin sheets are used for; ex.: roofing, siding, etc.

As for Arad's typical absurdity:

- What bodies? No mass grave for an alleged 870,000 Jews has been/can be shown.
- If the tale were true, one would think the Germans never heard of shovels.

Laughable as usual.

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Postby Carto's Cutlass Supreme » 1 decade 3 years ago (Tue Feb 07, 2006 5:36 pm)

I think it's an important question though. Because other things in the story, having been mistaken for other things. Delousing chambers as gas chambers. If a German speaker ever read the Zyklon b manual and it mentioned placing clothes on tin sheets, I'd be interested.

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Postby TMoran » 1 decade 3 years ago (Thu Feb 09, 2006 10:58 am)

One account for Belzec says they used tin sheets to line the alleged gas chambers.

Considering the mentioned reducing remains on tin sheets, metal plates were supposed to have been used as a surface with sledge hammers as the pounders.

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Postby PLAYWRIGHT » 1 decade 3 years ago (Fri Feb 10, 2006 12:14 am)

Tin (Chemical symbol SN) during World War II was a strategic material that was in short supply for all the participants.

I've lost track of a picture of a British forced labor camp in Africa where tribesman were worked to death at a tin mine, which has been justified as a war emergency, and maybe was, so important and so short was the supply. The main source of tin in the entire world at that time was Malaysia, and after the British lost it, nobody but the Japanese had access to high grade tin ores.

Tin was one of the major cargoes of the few blockade runners the German's tried to get past the British, with some success.

There's no way a camp like Belzec could have gotten tin sheets, much less sent a couple of prisoners on a low-priority fetching mission to get some. The stuff was as valuable as gold, and there's no way a camp like Belzec could have gotten their hands on the stuff. If you've followed the tale of how hard it was to get oils for waterproofing at the Krema's at Auschwitz, you know that requests for strategic materials in the Third Reich were a bureaucracy-intensive exercise, requiring a requistion, follow-up, and a review of the request by the appropriate board appointed to review requests for strategic materials.

In the Belzec tales, they just went out and got some. That's ridiculous. Even in the US, it was almost impossible to get your hands on tin for non-military purposes.

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Postby Kiwichap » 1 decade 3 years ago (Fri Feb 10, 2006 2:32 am)

Tin Sheets.

If they were pure tin sheets, ie SN, then with a cyanide solution they would be great for tin plating.

I can imagine these sheets would be in great demand for 'tin plating' of whatever needed tin plating.

I reckon tin plating was in great demand during the war.

Perhap 'zyclonB' in solution could be the catalyst.

I think a more stronger cyanide catalyst than what could be achieved with zyclonB would be needed.

But what do I know, Im not a chemist.

FREE GERMAR RUDOLF, he'll tell us!

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Postby Turpitz » 1 decade 3 years ago (Fri Feb 10, 2006 6:57 am)

He is probably refering to 'Mild Steel', but Industry liars don't know about practical matters.

Asking "Anybody know what tin sheets were used for?" is a bit like saying "How long is a piece of wood?"

I mean how big were the sheets? what gauge where they?

They could have been used for hundreds of different uses.

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Postby disillusioned » 1 decade 3 years ago (Fri Feb 10, 2006 7:00 am)

The tin sheets were used for the electrocution conveyer belts. DUH!

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Postby PLAYWRIGHT » 1 decade 3 years ago (Fri Feb 10, 2006 11:56 am)

I suppose they might have meant "tin-plated" sheets, though that poses some problems too.

Did a little research. Tin has a lower melting point than lead, so while it can be electro-plated, the usual plating method is just to dip whatever metal your working with into a bath of molten tin.

Tin when mixed with copper is very resistant to corrosion - that alloy is called bronze, and is what a penny is made out of. It's got a copper color, so they couldn't have confused bronze sheets with tin sheets.

Tin sheets supposedly lined the walls of gas chambers where they used diesel exhaust, not Zyklon-B. The purpose isn't clear - tin is corrosion-resistant, and has a low coefficient of friction (it's slippery) so it is cleaned easily. But, if plated using the molten method, it's also very soft, and would have been scored by fingernails, to the point of exposing whatever metal (steel? copper?) lay underneath the plating.

The sheets couldn't have been pure tin, too expensive under wartime conditions. The only thing I can think of, it would be easy to wash diesel residue off of the sheets, since nothing in diesel exhaust will bind to tin, AND, since the walls of the gas chambers would have been mirrors - something like a modern disco! - the chamber would appear bigger, and that might keep down panic.

On the whole though, pretty unlikely. Why he'd be picking up tin or tin-plated sheets AFTER the gas chambers had been constructed is not clear either, except - to replace scored and pock-marked sheets? Again, under wartime conditions, even tin-plated sheets would be very difficult to get, and require the special requistion system I outlined above. There are simply easier alternatives, especially in the Operation Reinhard camps, which were supposedly ad hoc, and built on the cheap.

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Postby Carto's Cutlass Supreme » 1 decade 3 years ago (Sat Feb 11, 2006 11:36 pm)

That's great research Playwright!

You pointed out that if tin sheets were that rare, as you mentioned, they wouldn't be buying them at the local hardware store in Lvov. Which is what his autobiography, quoted in Yitzhak Arad's book, says. It's just another thing that shows Reder is lying.

Here it is. Keep in mind that Reder was 61 years old at the time:
One morning I was told by the bully Irman that there was a need for tin in the camp...I went with a truck accompanied by four SS men and a guard to Lvov. After a whole day of loading tin sheets, I remained in the car...."

Belzec, Sobibor, Treblinka
Yitzhak Arad
page 264

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Postby Blue 88 » 1 decade 3 years ago (Sun Feb 12, 2006 2:22 am)

"Tin" here probably actually referred to aluminum siding or zinc galvanized iron sheets, much as we still refer to "tin cans" even though they are actually made of iron instead of tin. Also, I don't see why generic building materials necessarily must be ascribed to homicidal purposes. I guess it makes a better story that way.

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Postby Carto's Cutlass Supreme » 1 decade 3 years ago (Sun Feb 12, 2006 6:32 pm)

Tin sheets could be used for the cheapest of construction. Just as corrugated metal is used for that. That would fit with constructing a temporary delousing shower room. And in addition that would make the "tree branch fence" make sense too: the tree branch fence could provide some privacy for the nudity of the shower and outside the shower. Both the tin sheets and tree branch fence might have been a makeshift shower area, with water pressure or something powered by a diesel motor perhaps.

That the holocaust story makers modeled the hoax out of this might have been to make the Jews start "freaking out" when what they were seeing, was just as the rumors they'd heard about in Warsaw.

Going with this angle, there might really have been a sign "Obermajdan" at Treblinka, since "Treblinka" struck fear in the Jews due to the CENTOS pushed propaganda in Warsaw describing Treblinka as a death camp.

This is speculation of course.

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Postby Laurentz Dahl » 1 decade 1 year ago (Sat Aug 18, 2007 4:41 pm)

TMoran wrote:One account for Belzec says they used tin sheets to line the alleged gas chambers.


I believe Mr. Moran is referring to the very interesting account of Stanislaw Kozak from 1945. In it Kozak describes the construction of the first gas chamber installation in Belzec, which was carried out by local Poles (!) including himself.

The walls inside the barracks were covered with pap. In addition, the ground and walls up to 1.10 meters were covered by sheet metal.
(Arad, Belzec, Sobibor, Treblinka..., p.25)

Nothing is mentioned about tank engines or the like. On the other hand, Kozak talks about installing three ovens, one in each chamber:

In each of the three chambers of this barrack was installed an oven weighing 250 kg. (...) the oven was 1.10 meters high, 55 cm wide and 55 cm long.


Arad, tellingly, makes no comment on the contents of the Kozak account, although he spends an entire page quoting from it.

Kozak's account ends with the SS just letting the Poles who built the gas chambers go home. So much for security measures!

In a 1995 article in the French Journal Historama-Histoire (2Enquête sur les camps de la mort”) J-C Pressac identified the installations in Kozak's account as delousing chambers.

“Instead of a homicidal installation, one ought to accept the hypothesis of three delousing stations set up at Belzec, Sobibor, and Treblinka, whose purpose was prophylactic hygiene and the fight against typhoid fever.”
(Pressac quoted in Mattogno, Belzec, p.46)

J-C Pressacs hypothesis was that the three camps were only later turned into "extermination camps." Well, the good pharmacist had to resort to some kind of lip service to get the article published, I suppose.

Mattogno, in his book on Belzec, identifies the ovens described by Kozak as "Heißluftentwesungsöfen= hot air disinfestation ovens" (p.46, note 109)

Metal sheets covering the floor and parts of the walls in the "death chambers" seems unlikely in something supposedly disguised as shower rooms, but fits with a hot air delousing installation.

Perhaps the metal sheets in the later Belzec "gas chambers" - probably identical to the first ones in construction just twice as many - needed replacement.

Research in wartime or pre-WWII German journals concerned with (military) hygienic technology would perhaps result in more concrete data on this kind of installations.

Someone ironically mentioned the "electrochambers" which had metal sheet covered floors. The real hot air chambers may very well have served as an inspiration for this, similar to how disinfection showers utilizing steam may have been the origin of the Treblinka "steam chambers."

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Postby Carto's Cutlass Supreme » 1 decade 1 year ago (Fri Aug 24, 2007 6:20 pm)

Hi Laurentz: Good point that a delousing chamber with a metal (tin sheets) floor, could be miscontrued as an electric floor, hence the electrocution floor at Belzec.

Also good point that metal conducts heat and would thus be good for heat disinfection.

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Postby PotPie » 1 decade 1 year ago (Thu Aug 30, 2007 3:15 am)

The tin sheets certainly must have been for the electrified floors and pedal-driven brain bashing machines.

The use of tin sheets PROVES The Holocaust happened!!!


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